The effects of acetabular cup temperature and duration of cement pressurization on cement porosity in a canine total hip replacement model

S. L. Shields, K. S. Schulz, C. E. Hagan, Philip H Kass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine the effect of acetabular cup temperature and duration of cement pressurization on porosity of the acetabular cement mantel. Study design - In vitro study. Methods - Twenty-four polyurethane foam blocks prepared for acetabular prosthetic implantation were implanted with polyethylene acetabular cups using four combinations and variations of temperature and pressure: (1) high temperature/short-term pressurization; (2) high temperature/long-term pressurization; (3) low temperature/long-term pressurization; and (4) low temperature short-term pressurization. Five 1-mm-thick slices were taken from the center of each block using a tissue processing system. The slices were scanned into a personal computer using a photo slide scanner. Imaging software was used to determine cement surface area and size, number, and distribution of pores. The quality of the cement-implant interface was subjectively evaluated. Statistical analysis of relative cement porosity was performed by a Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance comparing the four groups individually and combining the short-term pressurization groups versus the long-term pressurization groups. Results - There were no significant differences in cement porosity between the four test groups (P = .11). There were no significant differences in porosity between the combined groups (P = .48). Conclusions - There is no benefit in prewarming acetabular cups before implantation. There are no deleterious effects of short-term pressurization of the cement during implantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-173
Number of pages7
JournalVeterinary Surgery
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2002

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Hip Replacement Arthroplasties
Porosity
cement
hips
porosity
Canidae
Temperature
duration
dogs
temperature
Microcomputers
Polyethylene
polyurethanes
scanners
foams
Analysis of Variance
polyethylene
in vitro studies
Software
surface area

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

The effects of acetabular cup temperature and duration of cement pressurization on cement porosity in a canine total hip replacement model. / Shields, S. L.; Schulz, K. S.; Hagan, C. E.; Kass, Philip H.

In: Veterinary Surgery, Vol. 31, No. 2, 03.2002, p. 167-173.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective - To determine the effect of acetabular cup temperature and duration of cement pressurization on porosity of the acetabular cement mantel. Study design - In vitro study. Methods - Twenty-four polyurethane foam blocks prepared for acetabular prosthetic implantation were implanted with polyethylene acetabular cups using four combinations and variations of temperature and pressure: (1) high temperature/short-term pressurization; (2) high temperature/long-term pressurization; (3) low temperature/long-term pressurization; and (4) low temperature short-term pressurization. Five 1-mm-thick slices were taken from the center of each block using a tissue processing system. The slices were scanned into a personal computer using a photo slide scanner. Imaging software was used to determine cement surface area and size, number, and distribution of pores. The quality of the cement-implant interface was subjectively evaluated. Statistical analysis of relative cement porosity was performed by a Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance comparing the four groups individually and combining the short-term pressurization groups versus the long-term pressurization groups. Results - There were no significant differences in cement porosity between the four test groups (P = .11). There were no significant differences in porosity between the combined groups (P = .48). Conclusions - There is no benefit in prewarming acetabular cups before implantation. There are no deleterious effects of short-term pressurization of the cement during implantation.",
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