The effect on problematic drinking behavior of a brief motivational interview shortly after a first arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol

A randomized trial

Garth H Utter, Jason B. Young, Leslie A. Theard, David M. Cropp, Craig J. Mohar, Daniel Eisenberg, Carol R. Schermer, Leon J. Owens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In medical settings, motivational interviewing-based "brief intervention" (BI) counseling reduces alcohol-related risk-taking behavior and harm in high-risk populations. Individuals arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) are another at-risk population. We sought to determine whether a BI administered shortly after a first DUI arrest might decrease problematic drinking behavior. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, parallel-group, double-blinded superiority randomized trial (NCT01270217), enrolling first-time DUI arrestees at a county jail from December 2010 through April 2011. Before their release, we randomized participants by computer-generated sequence to either a single BI or no discussion. We assessed 90-day change in Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores (range 0-40, higher values indicating more problematic drinking) as the primary outcome. RESULTS: We enrolled 200 subjects (100 to each arm), and 181 (90.5%, 86 control and 95 BI) completed the 90-day follow-up. Mean (SD) age was 30 (10) years, and 50% were men. Mean (SD) blood alcohol concentration upon arrest was 0.14% (0.04%). Mean (SD) baseline AUDIT scores were 8.8 (5.8) among control subjects and 7.7 (6.3) among BI subjects. At 90 days, AUDIT scores decreased by a mean (SD) 4.7 (5.1) units among control subjects and 3.4 (5.0) among BI subjects (difference, -1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to +0.1). The likelihood of subsequent binge drinking [relative risk (RR) 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0; BI vs. control], abstinence (RR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.4-2.1), alcohol-related injury to self or others (RR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.1-2.4), and seeking treatment (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.7) did not differ. CONCLUSION: A single BI counseling session shortly after first-time DUI arrest does not reduce 90-day self-reported drinking behavior or increase seeking treatment for drinking beyond that which occurs without such a discussion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-671
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Volume76
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Drinking Behavior
Alcohols
Interviews
Confidence Intervals
Drinking
Counseling
Motivational Interviewing
Binge Drinking
Driving Under the Influence
Risk-Taking

Keywords

  • Arrest
  • Brief intervention
  • Drinking behavior
  • Driving under the influence
  • Motivational interviewing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Surgery

Cite this

The effect on problematic drinking behavior of a brief motivational interview shortly after a first arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol : A randomized trial. / Utter, Garth H; Young, Jason B.; Theard, Leslie A.; Cropp, David M.; Mohar, Craig J.; Eisenberg, Daniel; Schermer, Carol R.; Owens, Leon J.

In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, Vol. 76, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 661-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Utter, Garth H ; Young, Jason B. ; Theard, Leslie A. ; Cropp, David M. ; Mohar, Craig J. ; Eisenberg, Daniel ; Schermer, Carol R. ; Owens, Leon J. / The effect on problematic drinking behavior of a brief motivational interview shortly after a first arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol : A randomized trial. In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 76, No. 3. pp. 661-671.
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T1 - The effect on problematic drinking behavior of a brief motivational interview shortly after a first arrest for driving under the influence of alcohol

T2 - A randomized trial

AU - Utter, Garth H

AU - Young, Jason B.

AU - Theard, Leslie A.

AU - Cropp, David M.

AU - Mohar, Craig J.

AU - Eisenberg, Daniel

AU - Schermer, Carol R.

AU - Owens, Leon J.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: In medical settings, motivational interviewing-based "brief intervention" (BI) counseling reduces alcohol-related risk-taking behavior and harm in high-risk populations. Individuals arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI) are another at-risk population. We sought to determine whether a BI administered shortly after a first DUI arrest might decrease problematic drinking behavior. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, parallel-group, double-blinded superiority randomized trial (NCT01270217), enrolling first-time DUI arrestees at a county jail from December 2010 through April 2011. Before their release, we randomized participants by computer-generated sequence to either a single BI or no discussion. We assessed 90-day change in Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) scores (range 0-40, higher values indicating more problematic drinking) as the primary outcome. RESULTS: We enrolled 200 subjects (100 to each arm), and 181 (90.5%, 86 control and 95 BI) completed the 90-day follow-up. Mean (SD) age was 30 (10) years, and 50% were men. Mean (SD) blood alcohol concentration upon arrest was 0.14% (0.04%). Mean (SD) baseline AUDIT scores were 8.8 (5.8) among control subjects and 7.7 (6.3) among BI subjects. At 90 days, AUDIT scores decreased by a mean (SD) 4.7 (5.1) units among control subjects and 3.4 (5.0) among BI subjects (difference, -1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.8 to +0.1). The likelihood of subsequent binge drinking [relative risk (RR) 1.6; 95% CI, 0.8-3.0; BI vs. control], abstinence (RR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.4-2.1), alcohol-related injury to self or others (RR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.1-2.4), and seeking treatment (RR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.7) did not differ. CONCLUSION: A single BI counseling session shortly after first-time DUI arrest does not reduce 90-day self-reported drinking behavior or increase seeking treatment for drinking beyond that which occurs without such a discussion.

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