The effect of the cellular stress response on human T-lymphotropic virus type I envelope protein expression

Janice M. Andrews, Michael Oglesbee, Michael Dale Lairmore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this report the influence of the cellular stress response in mediating changes in human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) viral envelope (Env) protein metabolism is determined. Previously, we reported that induction of the cellular stress response enhanced HTLV-I-mediated syncytia formation following induction of the cellular stress response in persistently infected lymphocytes. In this study, we show that the increase in HTLV-I-mediated syncytia formation following stress response induction is a result of increased cell surface expression of viral Env protein (gp46). Cellular stress in MT 2.6 cells did not alter the turnover of intracellular Env protein (gp68) as no changes in viral protein half-life were demonstrated as compared to non-stressed cells. However, Env expression in stressed cells treated with a protein synthesis inhibitor (cycloheximide) indicates the effect is mediated through increased translation of viral Env protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2905-2908
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of General Virology
Volume79
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Viral Envelope Proteins
Giant Cells
Viruses
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors
Viral Proteins
Cycloheximide
Half-Life
Lymphocytes
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Immunology

Cite this

The effect of the cellular stress response on human T-lymphotropic virus type I envelope protein expression. / Andrews, Janice M.; Oglesbee, Michael; Lairmore, Michael Dale.

In: Journal of General Virology, Vol. 79, No. 12, 1998, p. 2905-2908.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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