The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants

Natasha Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Alejandra Tellez, Luciana Molina, Golara Honari, Apra Sood, Wael Barsoum, James S. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To determine the effect of patch testing on surgical decision making and outcomes in patients evaluated for suspected metal hypersensitivity related to implants in bones or joints. Design: Medical chart review. Setting: Tertiary care academic medical center. Participants: All patients who had patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis related to orthopedic implants. Intervention: Patch testing. Main Outcome Measures: The surgeon's preoperative choice of metal implant alloy compared with patch testing results and the presence of hypersensitivity complications related to the metal implant on postsurgical follow-up. Results: Patients with potential metal hypersensitivity from implanted devices (N=72) were divided into 2 groups depending on timing of their patch testing: preimplantation (n=31) and postimplantation (n=41). History of hypersensitivity to metals was a predictor of positive patch test results to metals in both groups. Positive patch test results indicating metal hypersensitivity influenced the decisionmaking process of the referring surgeon in all preimplantation cases (n=21). Patients with metal hypersensitivity who received an allergen-free implant had surgical outcomes free of hypersensitivity complications (n=21). In patients who had positive patch test results to a metal in their implant after implantation, removal of the device led to resolution of associated symptoms (6 of 10 patients). Conclusions: The findings of this study support a role for patch testing in patientswith a clinical history of metal hypersensitivity before prosthetic device implantation. The decision on whether to remove an implanted device after positive patch test results should be made on a case-bycase basis, as decided by the surgeon and patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)687-693
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume148
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Orthopedics
Metals
Hypersensitivity
Patch Tests
Equipment and Supplies
Device Removal
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Tertiary Healthcare
Allergens
Decision Making
Joints
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants. / Mesinkovska, Natasha Atanaskova; Tellez, Alejandra; Molina, Luciana; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra; Barsoum, Wael; Taylor, James S.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 148, No. 6, 01.06.2012, p. 687-693.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mesinkovska, Natasha Atanaskova ; Tellez, Alejandra ; Molina, Luciana ; Honari, Golara ; Sood, Apra ; Barsoum, Wael ; Taylor, James S. / The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants. In: Archives of Dermatology. 2012 ; Vol. 148, No. 6. pp. 687-693.
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