The DHHS office on women's health initiative to improve women's heart health: Focus on knowledge and awareness among women with cardiometabolic risk factors

Elsa Grace V Giardina, Robert R. Sciacca, Joanne M. Foody, Gail D'Onofrio, Amparo C Villablanca, Shantelle Leatherwood, Anne L. Taylor, Suzanne G. Haynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The diversity of the U.S. population and disparities in the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) require that public health education strategies must target women and racial/ethnic minority groups to reduce their CVD risk factors, particularly in high-risk communities, such as women with the metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: The data reported here were based on a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of women recruited from four participating sites as part of the national intervention program, Improving, Enhancing and Evaluating Outcomes of Comprehensive Heart Care in High-Risk Women. Measures included baseline characteristics, sociodemographics, CVD related-knowledge and awareness, and Framingham risk score (FRS). Results: There were 443 of 698 women (63.5%) with one or more risk factors for the MS: non-Hispanic white (NHW), 51.5%; non-Hispanic black (NHB), 21.0%; Hispanic, 22.6%. Greater frequencies of MS occurred among Hispanic women (p<0.0001), those with less than a high school education (70.0%) (p<0.0001), Medicaid recipients (57.8%) (p<0.0001), and urbanites (43.3%) (p<0.001). Fewer participants with MS (62.6%) knew the leading cause of death compared to those without MS (72.1%) (p<0.0001). MS was associated with a lack of knowledge of the composite of knowing the symptoms of a heart attack plus the need to call 911 (odds ratio [OR] 0.41, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.97, p=0.04). Conclusions: Current strategies to decrease CVD risk are built on educating the public about traditional factors, including hypertension, smoking, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). An opportunity to broaden the scope for risk reduction among women with cardiometabolic risk derives from the observation that women with the MS have lower knowledge about CVD as the leading cause of death, the symptoms of a heart attack, and the ideal option for managing a CVD emergency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)893-900
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

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United States Dept. of Health and Human Services
Women's Health
Cardiovascular Diseases
Hispanic Americans
Cause of Death
Myocardial Infarction
Minority Groups
Medicaid
Risk Reduction Behavior
Health Education
Ethnic Groups
LDL Cholesterol
Emergencies
Public Health
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Hypertension
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The DHHS office on women's health initiative to improve women's heart health : Focus on knowledge and awareness among women with cardiometabolic risk factors. / Giardina, Elsa Grace V; Sciacca, Robert R.; Foody, Joanne M.; D'Onofrio, Gail; Villablanca, Amparo C; Leatherwood, Shantelle; Taylor, Anne L.; Haynes, Suzanne G.

In: Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 20, No. 6, 01.06.2011, p. 893-900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Giardina, Elsa Grace V ; Sciacca, Robert R. ; Foody, Joanne M. ; D'Onofrio, Gail ; Villablanca, Amparo C ; Leatherwood, Shantelle ; Taylor, Anne L. ; Haynes, Suzanne G. / The DHHS office on women's health initiative to improve women's heart health : Focus on knowledge and awareness among women with cardiometabolic risk factors. In: Journal of Women's Health. 2011 ; Vol. 20, No. 6. pp. 893-900.
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abstract = "Background: The diversity of the U.S. population and disparities in the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) require that public health education strategies must target women and racial/ethnic minority groups to reduce their CVD risk factors, particularly in high-risk communities, such as women with the metabolic syndrome (MS). Methods: The data reported here were based on a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of women recruited from four participating sites as part of the national intervention program, Improving, Enhancing and Evaluating Outcomes of Comprehensive Heart Care in High-Risk Women. Measures included baseline characteristics, sociodemographics, CVD related-knowledge and awareness, and Framingham risk score (FRS). Results: There were 443 of 698 women (63.5{\%}) with one or more risk factors for the MS: non-Hispanic white (NHW), 51.5{\%}; non-Hispanic black (NHB), 21.0{\%}; Hispanic, 22.6{\%}. Greater frequencies of MS occurred among Hispanic women (p<0.0001), those with less than a high school education (70.0{\%}) (p<0.0001), Medicaid recipients (57.8{\%}) (p<0.0001), and urbanites (43.3{\%}) (p<0.001). Fewer participants with MS (62.6{\%}) knew the leading cause of death compared to those without MS (72.1{\%}) (p<0.0001). MS was associated with a lack of knowledge of the composite of knowing the symptoms of a heart attack plus the need to call 911 (odds ratio [OR] 0.41, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.17-0.97, p=0.04). Conclusions: Current strategies to decrease CVD risk are built on educating the public about traditional factors, including hypertension, smoking, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). An opportunity to broaden the scope for risk reduction among women with cardiometabolic risk derives from the observation that women with the MS have lower knowledge about CVD as the leading cause of death, the symptoms of a heart attack, and the ideal option for managing a CVD emergency.",
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AU - Foody, Joanne M.

AU - D'Onofrio, Gail

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