The Developmental Sequence and Relations Between Gesture and Spoken Language in Toddlers With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Meagan R. Talbott, Gregory S. Young, Jeff Munson, Annette Estes, Laurie A. Vismara, Sally J Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In typical development, gestures precede and predict language development. This study examines the developmental sequence of expressive communication and relations between specific gestural and language milestones in toddlers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who demonstrate marked difficulty with gesture production and language. Communication skills across five stages (gestures, word approximations, first words, gesture-word combinations, and two-word combinations) were assessed monthly by blind raters for toddlers with ASD participating in an randomized control trial of parent-mediated treatment (N = 42, 12–30 months). Findings revealed that toddlers acquired skills following a reliable (vs. idiosyncratic) sequence and the majority of toddlers combined gestures with words before combining words in speech, but in contrast to the pattern observed in typical development, a significant subset acquired pointing after first words.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalChild Development
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Gestures
spoken language
autism
Language
language
Communication
Language Development
communication skills
parents
Autism Spectrum Disorder
communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

The Developmental Sequence and Relations Between Gesture and Spoken Language in Toddlers With Autism Spectrum Disorder. / Talbott, Meagan R.; Young, Gregory S.; Munson, Jeff; Estes, Annette; Vismara, Laurie A.; Rogers, Sally J.

In: Child Development, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Talbott, Meagan R. ; Young, Gregory S. ; Munson, Jeff ; Estes, Annette ; Vismara, Laurie A. ; Rogers, Sally J. / The Developmental Sequence and Relations Between Gesture and Spoken Language in Toddlers With Autism Spectrum Disorder. In: Child Development. 2019.
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