The clinical significance of neuropsychological changes following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

Christopher I. Higginson, Vicki L Wheelock, Dawn Levine, David S. King, Conrad T E Pappas, Karen A. Sigvardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the clinical importance of the question, a number of methodological issues have limited firm conclusions regarding the cognitive safety of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Amongst these issues, studies have generally failed to consider the postoperative changes that occur within individual patients. This study utilized reliable change indices (RCIs) derived from a PD sample to determine the frequency of clinically significant postoperative decline on a battery of neuropsychological measures. This approach addresses measurement reliability, potential practice effects, and disease progression. The proportion of patients experiencing clinically significant postoperative decline on measures of list learning and verbal fluency was greater than expected based on disease progression; however, the majority of patients (55%) did not experience a significant decline in performance on any of the cognitive tests administered, and only one experienced decline on more than one test. Therefore, the statistically significant declines on measures of list learning and verbal fluency observed in the sample as a whole were the result of clinically significant declines experienced by a minority of participants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2009

Fingerprint

Subthalamic Nucleus
Deep Brain Stimulation
Parkinson Disease
Verbal Learning
Disease Progression
Safety

Keywords

  • Clinical significance
  • Cognitive function
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Reliable change index
  • Subthalamic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

The clinical significance of neuropsychological changes following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. / Higginson, Christopher I.; Wheelock, Vicki L; Levine, Dawn; King, David S.; Pappas, Conrad T E; Sigvardt, Karen A.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.2009, p. 65-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Higginson, Christopher I. ; Wheelock, Vicki L ; Levine, Dawn ; King, David S. ; Pappas, Conrad T E ; Sigvardt, Karen A. / The clinical significance of neuropsychological changes following bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease. In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 2009 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 65-72.
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