The choline requirement of the growing kitten in the presence of just adequate dietary methionine

M. C. Schaeffer, Quinton Rogers, James Morris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the level at which choline is required by the growing kitten fed a 33% soy protein diet containing methionine just at its required level and total sulfur amino acids in excess. All experimental diets were isocaloric with a calculated metabolizable energy of 5.0 kcal/g. The soy protein used in each diet contributed 0.04% choline by analysis, and six levels of added choline were studied: 0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, and 0.30g choline per 100g of diet. Kittens were fed the diets for 30 days in a 4×6 randomized block design, and food intake and body weights were recorded three times weekly. At the end of the feeding period, the liver was removed and analyzed for water content and total lipids, and a heparinized blood sample was taken for subsequent analysis of plasma methionine, albumin, total protein, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Weight gain and liver lipid response curves exhibited a plateau at approximately 0.2% added choline. GOT and GPT activities were significantly higher in the plasma of kittens fed the diet with no added choline than in any other of the groups. However, activities of both enzymes in that group were within normal range. No effect of dietary choline concentration was seen on any other plasma parameter measured. Assuming that the bioavailability of the choline contributed by the dietary protein is 100%, data presented indicate that 0.24% choline in a diet of 33% protein and 5.0 kcal/g, is adequate to support maximal weight gain and minimal liver fat in the growing kitten, when methionine is present just at its required level, and total sulfur amino acids are present in excess.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-299
Number of pages11
JournalNutrition Research
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

Fingerprint

Choline
Methionine
Diet
Transaminases
Glutamic Acid
Sulfur Amino Acids
Oxaloacetic Acid
Soybean Proteins
Pyruvic Acid
Weight Gain
Liver
Lipids
Dietary Proteins
gamma-Glutamyltransferase
Serum Albumin
Biological Availability
Reference Values
Proteins
Eating
Fats

Keywords

  • animal nutrition
  • Choline
  • methionine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The choline requirement of the growing kitten in the presence of just adequate dietary methionine. / Schaeffer, M. C.; Rogers, Quinton; Morris, James.

In: Nutrition Research, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.01.1982, p. 289-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{73fb6a81195b4e1991e8d59d52bf744a,
title = "The choline requirement of the growing kitten in the presence of just adequate dietary methionine",
abstract = "This study was conducted to determine the level at which choline is required by the growing kitten fed a 33{\%} soy protein diet containing methionine just at its required level and total sulfur amino acids in excess. All experimental diets were isocaloric with a calculated metabolizable energy of 5.0 kcal/g. The soy protein used in each diet contributed 0.04{\%} choline by analysis, and six levels of added choline were studied: 0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, and 0.30g choline per 100g of diet. Kittens were fed the diets for 30 days in a 4×6 randomized block design, and food intake and body weights were recorded three times weekly. At the end of the feeding period, the liver was removed and analyzed for water content and total lipids, and a heparinized blood sample was taken for subsequent analysis of plasma methionine, albumin, total protein, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Weight gain and liver lipid response curves exhibited a plateau at approximately 0.2{\%} added choline. GOT and GPT activities were significantly higher in the plasma of kittens fed the diet with no added choline than in any other of the groups. However, activities of both enzymes in that group were within normal range. No effect of dietary choline concentration was seen on any other plasma parameter measured. Assuming that the bioavailability of the choline contributed by the dietary protein is 100{\%}, data presented indicate that 0.24{\%} choline in a diet of 33{\%} protein and 5.0 kcal/g, is adequate to support maximal weight gain and minimal liver fat in the growing kitten, when methionine is present just at its required level, and total sulfur amino acids are present in excess.",
keywords = "animal nutrition, Choline, methionine",
author = "Schaeffer, {M. C.} and Quinton Rogers and James Morris",
year = "1982",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S0271-5317(82)80010-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "289--299",
journal = "Nutrition Research",
issn = "0271-5317",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The choline requirement of the growing kitten in the presence of just adequate dietary methionine

AU - Schaeffer, M. C.

AU - Rogers, Quinton

AU - Morris, James

PY - 1982/1/1

Y1 - 1982/1/1

N2 - This study was conducted to determine the level at which choline is required by the growing kitten fed a 33% soy protein diet containing methionine just at its required level and total sulfur amino acids in excess. All experimental diets were isocaloric with a calculated metabolizable energy of 5.0 kcal/g. The soy protein used in each diet contributed 0.04% choline by analysis, and six levels of added choline were studied: 0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, and 0.30g choline per 100g of diet. Kittens were fed the diets for 30 days in a 4×6 randomized block design, and food intake and body weights were recorded three times weekly. At the end of the feeding period, the liver was removed and analyzed for water content and total lipids, and a heparinized blood sample was taken for subsequent analysis of plasma methionine, albumin, total protein, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Weight gain and liver lipid response curves exhibited a plateau at approximately 0.2% added choline. GOT and GPT activities were significantly higher in the plasma of kittens fed the diet with no added choline than in any other of the groups. However, activities of both enzymes in that group were within normal range. No effect of dietary choline concentration was seen on any other plasma parameter measured. Assuming that the bioavailability of the choline contributed by the dietary protein is 100%, data presented indicate that 0.24% choline in a diet of 33% protein and 5.0 kcal/g, is adequate to support maximal weight gain and minimal liver fat in the growing kitten, when methionine is present just at its required level, and total sulfur amino acids are present in excess.

AB - This study was conducted to determine the level at which choline is required by the growing kitten fed a 33% soy protein diet containing methionine just at its required level and total sulfur amino acids in excess. All experimental diets were isocaloric with a calculated metabolizable energy of 5.0 kcal/g. The soy protein used in each diet contributed 0.04% choline by analysis, and six levels of added choline were studied: 0, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25, and 0.30g choline per 100g of diet. Kittens were fed the diets for 30 days in a 4×6 randomized block design, and food intake and body weights were recorded three times weekly. At the end of the feeding period, the liver was removed and analyzed for water content and total lipids, and a heparinized blood sample was taken for subsequent analysis of plasma methionine, albumin, total protein, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities. Weight gain and liver lipid response curves exhibited a plateau at approximately 0.2% added choline. GOT and GPT activities were significantly higher in the plasma of kittens fed the diet with no added choline than in any other of the groups. However, activities of both enzymes in that group were within normal range. No effect of dietary choline concentration was seen on any other plasma parameter measured. Assuming that the bioavailability of the choline contributed by the dietary protein is 100%, data presented indicate that 0.24% choline in a diet of 33% protein and 5.0 kcal/g, is adequate to support maximal weight gain and minimal liver fat in the growing kitten, when methionine is present just at its required level, and total sulfur amino acids are present in excess.

KW - animal nutrition

KW - Choline

KW - methionine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42349114650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=42349114650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0271-5317(82)80010-9

DO - 10.1016/S0271-5317(82)80010-9

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:42349114650

VL - 2

SP - 289

EP - 299

JO - Nutrition Research

JF - Nutrition Research

SN - 0271-5317

IS - 3

ER -