The challenge of basic itch research

Earl Carstens, Taylor Follansbee, Mirela Iodi Carstens

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Basic mechanisms and pathways of itch signaling are reviewed, with an emphasis on the progress to date as well as remaining challenges in translating current knowledge to the clinical treatment of chronic itch. Recent studies reveal 3 subsets of pruriceptive sensory neurons highly expressing itch-related genes. Their fibers project into the spinal cord to activate neurons expressing gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRPR), which connect to neurons that express the substance P (NK-1) receptor and project to the parabrachial nucleus and thalamus. Spinal inhibitory interneurons release GABA, glycine and dynorphin to modulate segmental itch transmission. However, nearly all pruriceptive neurons also respond to algogens such as capsaicin. Alternative theories of itch-pain discrimination, such as intensity or spatial contrast, are based on the observation that focal stimulation of nociceptive nerve endings elicits itch while more widespread stimulation elicits pain. These findings cloud the issue of a labeled line for itch-a long-debated but currently unresolved challenge. In higher primates there is a dichotomy of histaminergic and non-histaminergic itch-signaling pathways which is less demarcated in rodents, suggesting species differences. A cardinal symptom of chronic itch is alloknesis, i.e., mechanical or touch-evoked itch. Recent evidence indicates that low-threshold mechanosensory afferents can access the spinal itch pathway, but are normally kept in check by inhibitory interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y (NPY). In chronic itch, NPY-mediated inhibition is reduced, allowing touch to excite itch-signaling pathways. These recent advances provide novel targets for development of therapeutic strategies to relieve chronic itch.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberadv00023
Pages (from-to)3-9
Number of pages7
JournalActa Dermato-Venereologica
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Neuropeptide Y
Touch
Interneurons
Neurons
Research
Bombesin Receptors
Neurokinin-1 Receptors
Dynorphins
Pain
Nerve Endings
Capsaicin
Sensory Receptor Cells
Substance P
Thalamus
Glycine
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Primates
Rodentia
Spinal Cord
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Alloknesis
  • Gastrin releasing peptide
  • Itch
  • Labeled-line coding
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Carstens, E., Follansbee, T., & Iodi Carstens, M. (2020). The challenge of basic itch research. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 100(1), 3-9. [adv00023]. https://doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3343

The challenge of basic itch research. / Carstens, Earl; Follansbee, Taylor; Iodi Carstens, Mirela.

In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, Vol. 100, No. 1, adv00023, 01.2020, p. 3-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Carstens, E, Follansbee, T & Iodi Carstens, M 2020, 'The challenge of basic itch research', Acta Dermato-Venereologica, vol. 100, no. 1, adv00023, pp. 3-9. https://doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3343
Carstens E, Follansbee T, Iodi Carstens M. The challenge of basic itch research. Acta Dermato-Venereologica. 2020 Jan;100(1):3-9. adv00023. https://doi.org/10.2340/00015555-3343
Carstens, Earl ; Follansbee, Taylor ; Iodi Carstens, Mirela. / The challenge of basic itch research. In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica. 2020 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 3-9.
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