The causes of false-positives encountered during the screening of old-world primates for antibodies to human and simian retroviruses by ELISA

Niels C Pedersen, Linda J Lowenstine, Preston Marx, Joanne Higgins, Jean Baulu, Michael McGuire, Murray B. Gardner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sera from 526 old-world primates representing 50 different species were screened by ELISA for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic viruses I and III, and simian retrovirus type 1 (SRV-1). About onefourth of the sera were positive by ELISA. There was a tendency, however, for the same sera to be positive for all three human and simian retroviruses. Only about one in five of the ELISA antibodypositive sera were confirmed to be positive by Western blotting. False-positive ELISA antibody tests were particularly common among sera from mandrills, crab-eating macaques, lion-tailed macaques, African green monkeys, and DeBrazza's and moustached guenons. Sera that were falsely positive in ELISA antibody tests to the three human and simian retroviruses were found to contain antibodies that reacted at comparable intensity with feline leukemia, infectious peritonitis and panleukopenia viruses. The false anti-viral activity of these sera was found to be due to antibodies that reacted with non-viral proteins that were copurified with all five virus preparations. These proteins were present in normal cat and human cells used to grow the various viruses and in gelatin. The implications of nonspecific cell-protein antibodies in primate sera were discussed in the light of this and previous seroepidemiologic studies of man and old-world monkeys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-228
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Virological Methods
Volume14
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

Keywords

  • ELISA
  • false-positive
  • primate
  • retrovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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