The brain metabolic patterns of clozapine- and fluphenazine-treated female patients with schizophrenia

Evidence of a sex effect

Robert M. Cohen, Thomas E Nordahl, William E. Semple, David Pickar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The regional cerebral glucose metabolic rates of clozapine-treated and fluphenazine-treated women with schizophrenia and normal controls were obtained by positron emission tomography (PET) using [18F]-2-fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) as the tracer. The regional metabolic patterns were compared to each other and to the changes previously observed in men. In women, as in men, both clozapine- and fluphenazine-treatment were associated with lower metabolism in the superior prefrontal cortex and higher metabolism in the medial temporal lobe. In both men and women, clozapine treatment led to a greater lowering of inferior prefrontal cortex activity than fluphenazine, which was statistically significant in the larger male cohort. Fluphenazine led to higher metabolic rates in the lateral temporal lobe than clozapine did, but the differences between the two neuroleptics were not statistically significant in either group. The greatest differences in the female as compared to the male responses to fluphenazine and clozapine were in the cingulate and striatum. As compared to controls, the cingulate metabolic rates of women were reduced by 9.1% and 11.4% on clozapine and fluphenazine, respectively; whereas, men have a statistically nonsignificant reduction of 0.1% with clozapine and a 3.2% increase with fluphenazine. In men, fluphenazine was associated with a much greater elevation in basal ganglia metabolic rates than was clozapine, 23.5% as compared to 3.75%; whereas, in women, basal ganglia metabolic rates are nearly equally increased by fluphenazine (21.6%) and clozapine (15.1%).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)632-640
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1999

Fingerprint

Fluphenazine
Clozapine
Schizophrenia
Brain
Basal Metabolism
Temporal Lobe
Basal Ganglia
Prefrontal Cortex
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Positron-Emission Tomography
Antipsychotic Agents
Glucose

Keywords

  • Cerebral metabolic rates
  • Cingulate
  • Deoxyglucose
  • Neuroleptics
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

The brain metabolic patterns of clozapine- and fluphenazine-treated female patients with schizophrenia : Evidence of a sex effect. / Cohen, Robert M.; Nordahl, Thomas E; Semple, William E.; Pickar, David.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 11.1999, p. 632-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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