The benefits of a psychiatric consultation-liaison service in a general hospital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this period of increased governmental regulation and decreased reimbursement for psychiatric services by third-party carriers, a fully staffed and financially stable psychiatric consultation-liaison service in the general hospital may still generate significant benefits for patients, hospital administrators, and psychiatrists: (1) an increased rate of diagnosis of psychiatric and medical disorders, (2) a reduction in the length of stay of medical or surgical patients, (3) a decreased utilization of medical services, and (4) the development of innovative consultation-liaison activities. This article summarizes these benefits and outlines training obstacles that must be overcome to increase cooperation between psychiatry and medicine so that these benefits may be realized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-218
Number of pages5
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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General Hospitals
Psychiatry
Referral and Consultation
Hospital Administrators
Mental Disorders
Length of Stay
Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The benefits of a psychiatric consultation-liaison service in a general hospital. / Hales, Robert E.

In: General Hospital Psychiatry, Vol. 7, No. 3, 1985, p. 214-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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