The Association of Parity with Greater Dynamic Pronation of the Feet

for the MOST Study Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Postpartum women are at increased risk for lower limb musculoskeletal disorders. Foot arch collapse following pregnancy has been reported as a mechanism for this increased risk. However, dynamic changes during gait in postpartum women have not been reported. Therefore, we assessed the association between parity and dynamic foot pronation during gait. Objective: To determine (1) if there is an association between parity and dynamic foot pronation (center of pressure excursion index, CPEI) during gait; and (2) the extent to which there is a dose-effect of parity on foot pronation. Design: The Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) Study is a longitudinal cohort study of adults with or at risk for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Setting: Two communities in the United States, Birmingham, Alabama and Iowa City, Iowa. Interventions: Not applicable. Participants: A population-based sample of 1177 MOST participants who were female, had complete CPEI and parity data and completed the baseline, 30- and 60-month visits. Main Outcome Measures: Odds of a one quintile decrease in CPEI by parity group and mean CPEI by parity group. Results: In 1177 women, mean age was 67.7 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 30.6 kg/m2. As parity increased, there was significantly greater foot pronation, lower mean CPEI: 19.1 (18.2-20.1), 18.9 (18.4-19.4), 18 (17.5-18.6) to 17.5 (16.4-18.6) in the 0 to 4 and >5 children groups, respectively; (P =.002), which remained significant after adjusting for race and clinic site (P =.005). There was a positive linear trend (β = 1.08, 1.03-1.14) in odds ratios of a one quintile decrease in CPEI (greater pronation) with increasing parity level (P =.004), which remained significant after adjusting for race and clinic site (P =.01). After adjusting for age and BMI, these two associations were no longer statistically significant. Conclusions: This study indicates a positive correlation between parity and greater dynamic pronation of the feet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPM and R
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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