The association between self-reported exercise intensity and acute coronary syndrome in emergency department chest pain patients

Adam J. Singer, Henry C. Thode, W. Frank Peacock, Judd E. Hollander, Deborah Diercks, Robert Birkhahn, Nathan Shapiro, Ted Glynn, Richard Nowack, Basmah Safdar, Chadwick Miller, Elizabeth Lewandrowski, John Nagurney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Regular exercise is thought to be protective against coronary artery disease. As a result, some physicians believe that the likelihood of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with acute chest pain is reduced in those who exercise regularly. We studied the association between self-reported frequency of exercising and the likelihood of ACS in patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) with chest pain. Methods: A multi-center prospective, descriptive, cohort study design was used in ED patients to determine whether the risk of ACS was reduced in patients who self-reported regular exercise. Results: There were 1093 patients enrolled. Median (interquartile range) age was 57 (48-67) years; 506 (45.7%) were female. ACS was diagnosed in 248 (22.7%) patients. Patients who did not exercise at least monthly were more likely to be diagnosed with ACS than those who did (129/466 [27.7%] vs. 119/627 [19.0%]; odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.23-2.17). After adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, smoking, and prior history, limited exercise was still associated with ACS (adjusted odds ratio 1.52, 95% CI 1.10-2.10). There was no apparent association between frequency and intensity of exercise and risk of ACS. Conclusion: Although self-reported frequency of exercise was significantly associated with a decrease in ACS in ED patients with chest pain, it should not be used to exclude ACS in symptomatic ED patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)17-22
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Keywords

  • acute coronary syndromes
  • chest pain diagnosis
  • emergency department
  • physical exercise

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The association between self-reported exercise intensity and acute coronary syndrome in emergency department chest pain patients'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this