The association between laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids

Michael Setzen, Manderly A. Cohen, Philip W. Perlman, Peter C Belafsky, Joel Guss, Kenneth F. Mattucci, Michael Ditkoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study goal was to evaluate the association among laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a prospective study of 204 consecutive patients undergoing flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing and an assessment of pharyngeal motor function (pharyngeal squeeze). Patients were divided into 6 groups depending on the results of sensory and motor testing in the laryngopharynx. Subjects were given 5 mL of thin liquid, and the prevalence of aspiration in each group was compared. RESULTS: The mean age of the entire cohort was 65 years (58% female). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with intact laryngopharyngeal sensation was 2% (3 of 137) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 29% (2 of 7) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with a moderate decrease in laryngopharyngeal sensation was 0% (0 of 9) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 67% (2 of 3) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with severely diminished or absent laryngopharyngeal sensation was 15% (5 of 33) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 100% (15 of 15) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severely diminished laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function are at an extremely high risk of aspirating thin liquids (100%). Moderate sensory deficits only appear to influence the prevalence of thin liquid aspiration in the presence of pharyngeal motor dysfunction. Severe laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits are associated with the aspiration of thin liquids regardless of the integrity of pharyngeal motor function. We assume that all persons with an insensate laryngopharynx aspirate thin liquids until proved otherwise. These results emphasize the relationship between laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function in the evaluation of patients for suspected aspiration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-102
Number of pages4
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume128
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypopharynx
Aspirations (Psychology)
Deglutition
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

The association between laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. / Setzen, Michael; Cohen, Manderly A.; Perlman, Philip W.; Belafsky, Peter C; Guss, Joel; Mattucci, Kenneth F.; Ditkoff, Michael.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 128, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 99-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Setzen, Michael ; Cohen, Manderly A. ; Perlman, Philip W. ; Belafsky, Peter C ; Guss, Joel ; Mattucci, Kenneth F. ; Ditkoff, Michael. / The association between laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery. 2003 ; Vol. 128, No. 1. pp. 99-102.
@article{7fba40018fb8426694c2f57d5f9696bc,
title = "The association between laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The study goal was to evaluate the association among laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a prospective study of 204 consecutive patients undergoing flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing and an assessment of pharyngeal motor function (pharyngeal squeeze). Patients were divided into 6 groups depending on the results of sensory and motor testing in the laryngopharynx. Subjects were given 5 mL of thin liquid, and the prevalence of aspiration in each group was compared. RESULTS: The mean age of the entire cohort was 65 years (58{\%} female). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with intact laryngopharyngeal sensation was 2{\%} (3 of 137) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 29{\%} (2 of 7) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with a moderate decrease in laryngopharyngeal sensation was 0{\%} (0 of 9) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 67{\%} (2 of 3) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with severely diminished or absent laryngopharyngeal sensation was 15{\%} (5 of 33) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 100{\%} (15 of 15) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severely diminished laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function are at an extremely high risk of aspirating thin liquids (100{\%}). Moderate sensory deficits only appear to influence the prevalence of thin liquid aspiration in the presence of pharyngeal motor dysfunction. Severe laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits are associated with the aspiration of thin liquids regardless of the integrity of pharyngeal motor function. We assume that all persons with an insensate laryngopharynx aspirate thin liquids until proved otherwise. These results emphasize the relationship between laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function in the evaluation of patients for suspected aspiration.",
author = "Michael Setzen and Cohen, {Manderly A.} and Perlman, {Philip W.} and Belafsky, {Peter C} and Joel Guss and Mattucci, {Kenneth F.} and Michael Ditkoff",
year = "2003",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1067/mhn.2003.52",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "128",
pages = "99--102",
journal = "Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)",
issn = "0194-5998",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids

AU - Setzen, Michael

AU - Cohen, Manderly A.

AU - Perlman, Philip W.

AU - Belafsky, Peter C

AU - Guss, Joel

AU - Mattucci, Kenneth F.

AU - Ditkoff, Michael

PY - 2003/1

Y1 - 2003/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: The study goal was to evaluate the association among laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a prospective study of 204 consecutive patients undergoing flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing and an assessment of pharyngeal motor function (pharyngeal squeeze). Patients were divided into 6 groups depending on the results of sensory and motor testing in the laryngopharynx. Subjects were given 5 mL of thin liquid, and the prevalence of aspiration in each group was compared. RESULTS: The mean age of the entire cohort was 65 years (58% female). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with intact laryngopharyngeal sensation was 2% (3 of 137) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 29% (2 of 7) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with a moderate decrease in laryngopharyngeal sensation was 0% (0 of 9) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 67% (2 of 3) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with severely diminished or absent laryngopharyngeal sensation was 15% (5 of 33) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 100% (15 of 15) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severely diminished laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function are at an extremely high risk of aspirating thin liquids (100%). Moderate sensory deficits only appear to influence the prevalence of thin liquid aspiration in the presence of pharyngeal motor dysfunction. Severe laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits are associated with the aspiration of thin liquids regardless of the integrity of pharyngeal motor function. We assume that all persons with an insensate laryngopharynx aspirate thin liquids until proved otherwise. These results emphasize the relationship between laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function in the evaluation of patients for suspected aspiration.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The study goal was to evaluate the association among laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits, pharyngeal motor function, and the prevalence of aspiration with thin liquids. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: We conducted a prospective study of 204 consecutive patients undergoing flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing with sensory testing and an assessment of pharyngeal motor function (pharyngeal squeeze). Patients were divided into 6 groups depending on the results of sensory and motor testing in the laryngopharynx. Subjects were given 5 mL of thin liquid, and the prevalence of aspiration in each group was compared. RESULTS: The mean age of the entire cohort was 65 years (58% female). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with intact laryngopharyngeal sensation was 2% (3 of 137) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 29% (2 of 7) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with a moderate decrease in laryngopharyngeal sensation was 0% (0 of 9) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 67% (2 of 3) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). The prevalence of aspiration in patients with severely diminished or absent laryngopharyngeal sensation was 15% (5 of 33) in persons with intact pharyngeal motor function and 100% (15 of 15) when pharyngeal motor function was impaired (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with severely diminished laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function are at an extremely high risk of aspirating thin liquids (100%). Moderate sensory deficits only appear to influence the prevalence of thin liquid aspiration in the presence of pharyngeal motor dysfunction. Severe laryngopharyngeal sensory deficits are associated with the aspiration of thin liquids regardless of the integrity of pharyngeal motor function. We assume that all persons with an insensate laryngopharynx aspirate thin liquids until proved otherwise. These results emphasize the relationship between laryngopharyngeal sensation and pharyngeal motor function in the evaluation of patients for suspected aspiration.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037285152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037285152&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1067/mhn.2003.52

DO - 10.1067/mhn.2003.52

M3 - Article

C2 - 12574766

AN - SCOPUS:0037285152

VL - 128

SP - 99

EP - 102

JO - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)

JF - Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)

SN - 0194-5998

IS - 1

ER -