The association between HIV infection and alcohol use

A systematic review and meta-analysis of African studies

Joseph C. Fisher, Heejung Bang, Saidi H. Kapiga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

212 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To summarize the association between alcohol use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection based on studies conducted in Africa, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for African studies that related alcohol use to HIV infection. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain pooled univariate and multivariate relative risk estimates. Subgroup analyses were performed for studies having different sample types: males or females and population-based or high-risk, and ones that differentiated between problem and asymptomatic drinkers. Alcohol drinkers were more apt to be HIV+ than nondrinkers. The pooled unadjusted odds ratio (OR) from 20 studies was 1.70 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.45-1.99). Results from 11 studies that adjusted for other risk factors produced a pooled risk estimate of 1.57 (95% CI = 1.42-1.72). Males and females had similar risk estimates, while studies involving high-risk samples tended to report larger pooled odds ratios than studies of the general population. When compared with nondrinkers, the pooled estimates of HIV risk were 1.57 (95% CI = 1.33-1.86) for nonproblem drinkers versus 2.04 (95% CI = 1.61-2.58) for problem drinkers, a statistically significant difference (z = 2.08, P <0.04). Alcohol use was associated with HIV infection in Africa and alcohol-related interventions might help reduce further expansion of the epidemic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)856-863
Number of pages8
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume34
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Virus Diseases
Meta-Analysis
Alcohols
HIV
Odds Ratio
PubMed
Population
Confidence Intervals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

The association between HIV infection and alcohol use : A systematic review and meta-analysis of African studies. / Fisher, Joseph C.; Bang, Heejung; Kapiga, Saidi H.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 34, No. 11, 11.2007, p. 856-863.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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