The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and hypertension in women of the CARDIA study

Imo A. Ebong, Pamela Schreiner, Cora E. Lewis, Duke Appiah, Azmina Ghelani, Mellissa Wellons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension in midlife women, characterize the association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and hypertension in women, and describe differences in hypertension prevalence by menopausal stage. Methods: We included 1,625 women, aged 43 to 55 years, with measurements of hs-CRP and detailed reproductive histories in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study at follow-up year 25. Prevalent hypertension was defined as a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg, or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or greater, or use of antihypertensive medications. Logistic regression was used for analysis. Results: The prevalence of hypertension was 25.8%, 37.8%, and 39.0% in premenopausal, perimenopausal, and postmenopausal women, respectively. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of hs-CRP was 3.08 (1.12, 7.98) μg/mL and 1.18 (0.48, 3.15) μg/mL in women with and without hypertension, respectively. After adjusting for confounders, metabolic factors and body mass index, a doubling (100% increment) in hs-CRP levels was significantly associated with hypertension in premenopausal (1.27 [1.01-1.59]), but not in perimenopausal (1.12 [0.99-1.27]) or postmenopausal (1.09 [0.95-1.26]) women. Conclusions: Hypertension was common in midlife women. The association of hs-CRP and hypertension was consistent across menopausal stages. The association of hs-CRP with hypertension was independent of body mass index in premenopausal but not in perimenopausal or postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)662-668
Number of pages7
JournalMenopause
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • C-reactive protein
  • Hypertension
  • Menopause

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and hypertension in women of the CARDIA study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this