The association between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status

Hermine Poghosyan, Janice F Bell, Jill G Joseph, Mary E. Cooley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: A diagnosis of cancer within the family provides an opportunity for smokers to adopt a health-promoting behavior. This study examines the associations between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status using population-based data with a large and diverse sample. Method: Cross-sectional data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey on 47,331 adults were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to account for the survey design with results generalizable to non-institutionalized adults in California (27.4. million). Results: In 2009, 3.7. million (13.6%) adults were current-smokers, 6.3. million (23.0%) were former smokers and 17.4. million (63.4%) were never-smokers. Nine-million-six-hundred-thousand (35%) had a first-degree family history of cancer. Controlling for all covariates, first-degree family history of cancer was significantly associated with being a current smoker (OR. = 1.16; 95% CI. = 1.01-1.35) and to being a former smoker (OR. = 1.17; 95% CI. = 1.05-1.30). Conclusion: In California, although many adults with a first-degree family history of cancer quit smoking, a significant subset still smoke which places them at higher risk for poor health outcomes. This subset represents an important target population for smoking cessation interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12-16
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume66
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Smoking
Neoplasms
Health Services Needs and Demand
Health
Smoking Cessation
Health Surveys
Smoke
Interviews
Weights and Measures
Population

Keywords

  • Family cancer history
  • Smoking cessation
  • Smoking status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

The association between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status. / Poghosyan, Hermine; Bell, Janice F; Joseph, Jill G; Cooley, Mary E.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 66, 2014, p. 12-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: A diagnosis of cancer within the family provides an opportunity for smokers to adopt a health-promoting behavior. This study examines the associations between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status using population-based data with a large and diverse sample. Method: Cross-sectional data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey on 47,331 adults were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to account for the survey design with results generalizable to non-institutionalized adults in California (27.4. million). Results: In 2009, 3.7. million (13.6{\%}) adults were current-smokers, 6.3. million (23.0{\%}) were former smokers and 17.4. million (63.4{\%}) were never-smokers. Nine-million-six-hundred-thousand (35{\%}) had a first-degree family history of cancer. Controlling for all covariates, first-degree family history of cancer was significantly associated with being a current smoker (OR. = 1.16; 95{\%} CI. = 1.01-1.35) and to being a former smoker (OR. = 1.17; 95{\%} CI. = 1.05-1.30). Conclusion: In California, although many adults with a first-degree family history of cancer quit smoking, a significant subset still smoke which places them at higher risk for poor health outcomes. This subset represents an important target population for smoking cessation interventions.",
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N2 - Objective: A diagnosis of cancer within the family provides an opportunity for smokers to adopt a health-promoting behavior. This study examines the associations between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status using population-based data with a large and diverse sample. Method: Cross-sectional data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey on 47,331 adults were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to account for the survey design with results generalizable to non-institutionalized adults in California (27.4. million). Results: In 2009, 3.7. million (13.6%) adults were current-smokers, 6.3. million (23.0%) were former smokers and 17.4. million (63.4%) were never-smokers. Nine-million-six-hundred-thousand (35%) had a first-degree family history of cancer. Controlling for all covariates, first-degree family history of cancer was significantly associated with being a current smoker (OR. = 1.16; 95% CI. = 1.01-1.35) and to being a former smoker (OR. = 1.17; 95% CI. = 1.05-1.30). Conclusion: In California, although many adults with a first-degree family history of cancer quit smoking, a significant subset still smoke which places them at higher risk for poor health outcomes. This subset represents an important target population for smoking cessation interventions.

AB - Objective: A diagnosis of cancer within the family provides an opportunity for smokers to adopt a health-promoting behavior. This study examines the associations between having a first-degree family history of cancer and smoking status using population-based data with a large and diverse sample. Method: Cross-sectional data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey on 47,331 adults were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to account for the survey design with results generalizable to non-institutionalized adults in California (27.4. million). Results: In 2009, 3.7. million (13.6%) adults were current-smokers, 6.3. million (23.0%) were former smokers and 17.4. million (63.4%) were never-smokers. Nine-million-six-hundred-thousand (35%) had a first-degree family history of cancer. Controlling for all covariates, first-degree family history of cancer was significantly associated with being a current smoker (OR. = 1.16; 95% CI. = 1.01-1.35) and to being a former smoker (OR. = 1.17; 95% CI. = 1.05-1.30). Conclusion: In California, although many adults with a first-degree family history of cancer quit smoking, a significant subset still smoke which places them at higher risk for poor health outcomes. This subset represents an important target population for smoking cessation interventions.

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