The antioxidant properties of zinc: Interactions with iron and antioxidants

M. Paola Zago, Patricia I. Oteiza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

240 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Potential mechanisms underlying zinc's capacity to protect membranes from lipid oxidation were examined in liposomes. Using lipid oxidation initiators with different chemical and physical properties (transition metals, lipid- or water-soluble azo compounds, ultraviolet radiation c (UVc), superoxide radical anion (O2 ·-), and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) we observed that zinc only prevented copper (Cu2+)- and iron (Fe2+)-initiated lipid oxidation. In the presence of Fe2+, the antioxidant action of zinc depended directly on the negative charge density of the membrane bilayer. An inverse correlation (r2: 0.96) was observed between the capacity of zinc to prevent iron binding to the membrane and the inhibitory effect of zinc on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. The interaction of zinc with the bilayer did not affect physical properties of the membrane, including rigidification and lateral phase separation known to increase lipid oxidation rates. The interactions between zinc and the lipid- (α-tocopherol) and water- (epicatechin) soluble antioxidants were studied. The inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid oxidation by either α-tocopherol or epicatechin was increased by the simultaneous addition of zinc. The combined actions of α-tocopherol (0.01 mol%), epicatechin (0.5 μM) and zinc (5-50 μM) almost completely prevented Fe2+ (25 μM)-initiated lipid oxidation. These results show that zinc can protect membranes from iron-initiated lipid oxidation by occupying negatively charged sites with potential iron binding capacity. In addition, the synergistic actions of zinc with lipid and water-soluble antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation, suggests that zinc is a pivotal component of the antioxidant defense network that protects membranes from oxidation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)266-274
Number of pages9
JournalFree Radical Biology and Medicine
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Zinc
Iron
Antioxidants
Lipids
Oxidation
Tocopherols
Catechin
Membranes
Superoxides
Water
Azo Compounds
Physical properties
Peroxynitrous Acid
Membrane Lipids
Charge density
Liposomes
Ultraviolet radiation
Phase separation
Chemical properties
Transition metals

Keywords

  • α-Tocopherol
  • Antioxidants
  • Epicatechin
  • Free radicals
  • Lipid oxidation
  • Zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Toxicology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

The antioxidant properties of zinc : Interactions with iron and antioxidants. / Zago, M. Paola; Oteiza, Patricia I.

In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine, Vol. 31, No. 2, 15.07.2001, p. 266-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zago, M. Paola ; Oteiza, Patricia I. / The antioxidant properties of zinc : Interactions with iron and antioxidants. In: Free Radical Biology and Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 266-274.
@article{715d16832361451b821760316631ae16,
title = "The antioxidant properties of zinc: Interactions with iron and antioxidants",
abstract = "Potential mechanisms underlying zinc's capacity to protect membranes from lipid oxidation were examined in liposomes. Using lipid oxidation initiators with different chemical and physical properties (transition metals, lipid- or water-soluble azo compounds, ultraviolet radiation c (UVc), superoxide radical anion (O2 ·-), and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) we observed that zinc only prevented copper (Cu2+)- and iron (Fe2+)-initiated lipid oxidation. In the presence of Fe2+, the antioxidant action of zinc depended directly on the negative charge density of the membrane bilayer. An inverse correlation (r2: 0.96) was observed between the capacity of zinc to prevent iron binding to the membrane and the inhibitory effect of zinc on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. The interaction of zinc with the bilayer did not affect physical properties of the membrane, including rigidification and lateral phase separation known to increase lipid oxidation rates. The interactions between zinc and the lipid- (α-tocopherol) and water- (epicatechin) soluble antioxidants were studied. The inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid oxidation by either α-tocopherol or epicatechin was increased by the simultaneous addition of zinc. The combined actions of α-tocopherol (0.01 mol{\%}), epicatechin (0.5 μM) and zinc (5-50 μM) almost completely prevented Fe2+ (25 μM)-initiated lipid oxidation. These results show that zinc can protect membranes from iron-initiated lipid oxidation by occupying negatively charged sites with potential iron binding capacity. In addition, the synergistic actions of zinc with lipid and water-soluble antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation, suggests that zinc is a pivotal component of the antioxidant defense network that protects membranes from oxidation.",
keywords = "α-Tocopherol, Antioxidants, Epicatechin, Free radicals, Lipid oxidation, Zinc",
author = "Zago, {M. Paola} and Oteiza, {Patricia I.}",
year = "2001",
month = "7",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/S0891-5849(01)00583-4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "31",
pages = "266--274",
journal = "Free Radical Biology and Medicine",
issn = "0891-5849",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The antioxidant properties of zinc

T2 - Interactions with iron and antioxidants

AU - Zago, M. Paola

AU - Oteiza, Patricia I.

PY - 2001/7/15

Y1 - 2001/7/15

N2 - Potential mechanisms underlying zinc's capacity to protect membranes from lipid oxidation were examined in liposomes. Using lipid oxidation initiators with different chemical and physical properties (transition metals, lipid- or water-soluble azo compounds, ultraviolet radiation c (UVc), superoxide radical anion (O2 ·-), and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) we observed that zinc only prevented copper (Cu2+)- and iron (Fe2+)-initiated lipid oxidation. In the presence of Fe2+, the antioxidant action of zinc depended directly on the negative charge density of the membrane bilayer. An inverse correlation (r2: 0.96) was observed between the capacity of zinc to prevent iron binding to the membrane and the inhibitory effect of zinc on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. The interaction of zinc with the bilayer did not affect physical properties of the membrane, including rigidification and lateral phase separation known to increase lipid oxidation rates. The interactions between zinc and the lipid- (α-tocopherol) and water- (epicatechin) soluble antioxidants were studied. The inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid oxidation by either α-tocopherol or epicatechin was increased by the simultaneous addition of zinc. The combined actions of α-tocopherol (0.01 mol%), epicatechin (0.5 μM) and zinc (5-50 μM) almost completely prevented Fe2+ (25 μM)-initiated lipid oxidation. These results show that zinc can protect membranes from iron-initiated lipid oxidation by occupying negatively charged sites with potential iron binding capacity. In addition, the synergistic actions of zinc with lipid and water-soluble antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation, suggests that zinc is a pivotal component of the antioxidant defense network that protects membranes from oxidation.

AB - Potential mechanisms underlying zinc's capacity to protect membranes from lipid oxidation were examined in liposomes. Using lipid oxidation initiators with different chemical and physical properties (transition metals, lipid- or water-soluble azo compounds, ultraviolet radiation c (UVc), superoxide radical anion (O2 ·-), and peroxynitrite (ONOO-) we observed that zinc only prevented copper (Cu2+)- and iron (Fe2+)-initiated lipid oxidation. In the presence of Fe2+, the antioxidant action of zinc depended directly on the negative charge density of the membrane bilayer. An inverse correlation (r2: 0.96) was observed between the capacity of zinc to prevent iron binding to the membrane and the inhibitory effect of zinc on Fe2+-initiated lipid oxidation. The interaction of zinc with the bilayer did not affect physical properties of the membrane, including rigidification and lateral phase separation known to increase lipid oxidation rates. The interactions between zinc and the lipid- (α-tocopherol) and water- (epicatechin) soluble antioxidants were studied. The inhibition of Fe2+-induced lipid oxidation by either α-tocopherol or epicatechin was increased by the simultaneous addition of zinc. The combined actions of α-tocopherol (0.01 mol%), epicatechin (0.5 μM) and zinc (5-50 μM) almost completely prevented Fe2+ (25 μM)-initiated lipid oxidation. These results show that zinc can protect membranes from iron-initiated lipid oxidation by occupying negatively charged sites with potential iron binding capacity. In addition, the synergistic actions of zinc with lipid and water-soluble antioxidants to prevent lipid oxidation, suggests that zinc is a pivotal component of the antioxidant defense network that protects membranes from oxidation.

KW - α-Tocopherol

KW - Antioxidants

KW - Epicatechin

KW - Free radicals

KW - Lipid oxidation

KW - Zinc

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035879826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035879826&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0891-5849(01)00583-4

DO - 10.1016/S0891-5849(01)00583-4

M3 - Article

C2 - 11440839

AN - SCOPUS:0035879826

VL - 31

SP - 266

EP - 274

JO - Free Radical Biology and Medicine

JF - Free Radical Biology and Medicine

SN - 0891-5849

IS - 2

ER -