The addicted synapse: Mechanisms of synaptic and structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens

Scott J. Russo, David M. Dietz, Dani Dumitriu, John Morrison, Robert C. Malenka, Eric J. Nestler

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

389 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Addictive drugs cause persistent restructuring of several neuronal cell types in the limbic regions of brain thought to be responsible for long-term behavioral plasticity driving addiction. Although these structural changes are well documented in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons, little is known regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Additionally, it remains unclear whether structural plasticity and its synaptic concomitants drive addictive behaviors or whether they reflect homeostatic compensations to the drug not related to addiction per se. Here, we discuss recent paradoxical data, which either support or oppose the hypothesis that drug-induced changes in dendritic spines drive addictive behavior. We define areas where future investigation can provide a more detailed picture of drug-induced synaptic reorganization, including ultrastructural, electrophysiological and behavioral studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-276
Number of pages10
JournalTrends in Neurosciences
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neuronal Plasticity
Nucleus Accumbens
Synapses
Addictive Behavior
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Dendritic Spines
Neurons
Brain
Drive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The addicted synapse : Mechanisms of synaptic and structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens. / Russo, Scott J.; Dietz, David M.; Dumitriu, Dani; Morrison, John; Malenka, Robert C.; Nestler, Eric J.

In: Trends in Neurosciences, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.06.2010, p. 267-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Russo, Scott J. ; Dietz, David M. ; Dumitriu, Dani ; Morrison, John ; Malenka, Robert C. ; Nestler, Eric J. / The addicted synapse : Mechanisms of synaptic and structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens. In: Trends in Neurosciences. 2010 ; Vol. 33, No. 6. pp. 267-276.
@article{098fd22a9fea43d3b3b7d32cf257a8b1,
title = "The addicted synapse: Mechanisms of synaptic and structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens",
abstract = "Addictive drugs cause persistent restructuring of several neuronal cell types in the limbic regions of brain thought to be responsible for long-term behavioral plasticity driving addiction. Although these structural changes are well documented in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons, little is known regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Additionally, it remains unclear whether structural plasticity and its synaptic concomitants drive addictive behaviors or whether they reflect homeostatic compensations to the drug not related to addiction per se. Here, we discuss recent paradoxical data, which either support or oppose the hypothesis that drug-induced changes in dendritic spines drive addictive behavior. We define areas where future investigation can provide a more detailed picture of drug-induced synaptic reorganization, including ultrastructural, electrophysiological and behavioral studies.",
author = "Russo, {Scott J.} and Dietz, {David M.} and Dani Dumitriu and John Morrison and Malenka, {Robert C.} and Nestler, {Eric J.}",
year = "2010",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.tins.2010.02.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "267--276",
journal = "Trends in Neurosciences",
issn = "0378-5912",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The addicted synapse

T2 - Mechanisms of synaptic and structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens

AU - Russo, Scott J.

AU - Dietz, David M.

AU - Dumitriu, Dani

AU - Morrison, John

AU - Malenka, Robert C.

AU - Nestler, Eric J.

PY - 2010/6/1

Y1 - 2010/6/1

N2 - Addictive drugs cause persistent restructuring of several neuronal cell types in the limbic regions of brain thought to be responsible for long-term behavioral plasticity driving addiction. Although these structural changes are well documented in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons, little is known regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Additionally, it remains unclear whether structural plasticity and its synaptic concomitants drive addictive behaviors or whether they reflect homeostatic compensations to the drug not related to addiction per se. Here, we discuss recent paradoxical data, which either support or oppose the hypothesis that drug-induced changes in dendritic spines drive addictive behavior. We define areas where future investigation can provide a more detailed picture of drug-induced synaptic reorganization, including ultrastructural, electrophysiological and behavioral studies.

AB - Addictive drugs cause persistent restructuring of several neuronal cell types in the limbic regions of brain thought to be responsible for long-term behavioral plasticity driving addiction. Although these structural changes are well documented in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons, little is known regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms. Additionally, it remains unclear whether structural plasticity and its synaptic concomitants drive addictive behaviors or whether they reflect homeostatic compensations to the drug not related to addiction per se. Here, we discuss recent paradoxical data, which either support or oppose the hypothesis that drug-induced changes in dendritic spines drive addictive behavior. We define areas where future investigation can provide a more detailed picture of drug-induced synaptic reorganization, including ultrastructural, electrophysiological and behavioral studies.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953544634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953544634&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tins.2010.02.002

DO - 10.1016/j.tins.2010.02.002

M3 - Review article

C2 - 20207024

AN - SCOPUS:77953544634

VL - 33

SP - 267

EP - 276

JO - Trends in Neurosciences

JF - Trends in Neurosciences

SN - 0378-5912

IS - 6

ER -