The 2014 Bernard B. Brodie Award lecture - Epoxide hydrolases: Drug metabolism to therapeutics for chronic pain

Sean D. Kodani, Bruce D. Hammock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dr. Bernard Brodie's legacy is built on fundamental discoveries in pharmacology and drug metabolism that were then translated to the clinic to improve patient care. Similarly, the development of a novel class of therapeutics termed the soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) inhibitors was originally spurred by fundamental research exploring the biochemistry and physiology of the sEH. Here, we present an overview of the history and current state of research on epoxide hydrolases, specifically focusing on sEHs. In doing so, we start with the translational project studying the metabolism of the insect juvenile hormone mimic R-20458 [(E)-6,7-epoxy-1-(4-ethylphenoxy)-3,7-dimethyl-2-octene], which led to the identification of the mammalian sEH. Further investigation of this enzyme and its substrates, including the epoxyeicosatrienoic acids, led to insight into mechanisms of inflammation, chronic and neuropathic pain, angiogenesis, and other physiologic processes. This basic knowledge in turn led to the development of potent inhibitors of the sEH that are promising therapeutics for pain, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, arthritis, and other disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)788-802
Number of pages15
JournalDrug Metabolism and Disposition
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmaceutical Science

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