Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and incident cardiovascular disease and mortality in the cardiovascular health study

Molly M. Shores, Mary L. Biggs, Alice M. Arnold, Nicholas L. Smith, W. T. Longstreth, Jorge R. Kizer, Calvin H Hirsch, Anne R. Cappola, Alvin M. Matsumoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: Low testosterone (T) is associated with prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. DHT, a more potent androgen, may also be associated with CVD and mortality, but few studies have examined this. Objective: The study objective was to examine whether T and DHT are risk factors for incident CVD and mortality. Design: In a longitudinal cohort study, we evaluated whether total T, calculated free T (cFT), DHT, and calculated free DHT were associated with incident CVD and mortality in men in the Cardiovascular Health Study (mean age 76, range 66-97 years) who were free of CVD at the time of blood collection. Main Outcome: The main outcomes were incident CVD and all-cause mortality. Results:Among1032menfollowed for amedianof 9 years, 436 incidentCVDeventsand777 deaths occurred. In models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, total TandcFTwerenot associated with incident CVD or all-cause mortality, whereas DHT and calculated free DHT had curvilinear associations with incident CVD (P < .002 and P = .04, respectively) and all-cause mortality (P < .001 for both). Conclusions: In a cohort of elderly men,DHTand calculated freeDHTwere associated with incident CVD and all-cause mortality. Further studies are needed to confirm these results and to clarify the underlying physiologic mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2061-2068
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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    Shores, M. M., Biggs, M. L., Arnold, A. M., Smith, N. L., Longstreth, W. T., Kizer, J. R., Hirsch, C. H., Cappola, A. R., & Matsumoto, A. M. (2014). Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and incident cardiovascular disease and mortality in the cardiovascular health study. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 99(6), 2061-2068. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2013-3576