Tensins - emerging insights into their domain functions, biological roles and disease relevance

Yi Chun Liao, Su Hao Lo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Tensins are a family of focal adhesion proteins consisting of four members in mammals (TNS1, TNS2, TNS3 and TNS4). Their multiple domains and activities contribute to the molecular linkage between the extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal networks, as well as mediating signal transduction pathways, leading to a variety of physiological processes, including cell proliferation, attachment, migration and mechanical sensing in a cell. Tensins are required for maintaining normal tissue structures and functions, especially in the kidney and heart, as well as in muscle regeneration, in animals. This Review discusses our current understanding of the domain functions and biological roles of tensins in cells and mice, as well as highlighting their relevance to human diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberjcs254029
JournalJournal of cell science
Volume134
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • CTEN
  • Cystic kidney
  • Focal adhesion
  • Mitral valve prolapse
  • Nephrotic syndrome
  • PTB
  • SH2
  • Tensin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

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