Temporal variability of indoor dust concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds

Kyunghoon Kim, Hyeong Moo Shin, Luann Wong, Thomas M. Young, Deborah H. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The determinants of the temporal variability of indoor dust concentrations of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) remain mostly unexplored. We examined temporal variability of dust concentrations and factors affecting dust concentrations for a wide range of SVOCs. We collected dust samples three times from 29 California homes during a period of 22 months and quantified concentrations of 47 SVOCs in 87 dust samples. We computed intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) using three samples collected within the same house. We calculated correlation coefficients (r) between two seasons with similar climate (spring and fall) and between two seasons with opposite climate (summer and winter). Among 26 compounds that were detected in more than 50% of the samples at all three visits, 20 compounds had ICCs above 0.50 and 6 compounds had ICCs below 0.50. For 19 out of 26 compounds, correlation coefficients between spring and fall (r = 0.48-0.98) were higher than those between summer and winter (r = 0.09-0.92), implying seasonal effects on dust concentrations. Our study showed that within-home temporal variability of dust concentrations was small (ICC > 0.50) for most SVOCs, but dust concentrations may vary over time for some SVOCs with seasonal variations in source rates, such as product use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalIndoor Air
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • concentration
  • dust
  • intraclass correlation coefficient
  • semivolatile organic compound
  • source rate
  • temporal variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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