Temporal connections between Culex tarsalis abundance and transmission of Western equine encephalomyelitis virus in California

Chris Barker, Wesley O. Johnson, Bruce F. Eldridge, Bborie K. Park, Forrest Melton, William Reisen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Definition of targets for vector control requires an understanding of the relationship between vector abundance and the intensity of arbovirus transmission. Using an extensive surveillance dataset with observations from sentinel chicken flocks and mosquito traps paired in time and space, hierarchical autoregressive logistic regression models were developed to predict the probability of seroconversion in chickens for western equine encephalomyelitis virus (WEEV) based on the relative abundance of the principal vector, Culex tarsalis. After adjustments for confounders, the abundance of Cx. tarsalis 29-42 d before the date of chicken sampling was credibly associated with the risk of WEEV transmission in both the Central and Coachella Valleys, and a doubling of relative Cx. tarsalis abundance was associated with a 58% increase in the odds of seroconversion. The critical time windows identified in our study highlight the need for surveillance of vector populations and forecasting models to guide proactive vector control measures before the detection of transmission to sentinel chickens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1185-1193
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume82
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

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