Television-Related Head Injuries in Children

A Secondary Analysis of a Large Cohort Study of Head-Injured Children in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network

for the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology, cranial computed tomography (CT) findings, and clinical outcomes of children with blunt head trauma after television tip-over injuries. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of children younger than 18 years prospectively evaluated for blunt head trauma at 25 emergency departments (EDs) in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network from June 2004 to September 2006. Children injured from falling televisions were included. Patients were excluded if injuries occurred more than 24 hours before ED evaluation or if neuroimaging was obtained before evaluation. Data collected included age, race, sex, cranial CT findings, and clinical outcomes. Clinically important traumatic brain injuries (ciTBIs) were defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the TBI, or hospital admission of 2 nights or more for the head injury, in association with TBI on CT. RESULTS: A total of 43,904 children were enrolled into the primary study and 218 (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4% to 0.6%) were struck by falling televisions. The median (interquartile range) age of the 218 patients was 3.1 (1.9–4.9) years. Seventy-five (34%) of the 218 underwent CT scanning. Ten (13.3%; 95% CI, 6.6% to 23.2%) of the 75 patients with an ED CT had traumatic findings on cranial CT scan. Six patients met the criteria for ciTBI. Three of these patients died. All 6 patients with ciTBIs were younger than 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Television tip-overs may cause ciTBIs in children, including death, and the most severe injuries occur in children 5 years or younger. These injuries may be preventable by simple preventive measures such as anchoring television sets with straps.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Emergency Care
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 6 2015

Fingerprint

Television
Emergency Medical Services
Craniocerebral Trauma
Cohort Studies
Head
Tomography
Pediatrics
Accidental Falls
Research
Hospital Emergency Service
Wounds and Injuries
Confidence Intervals
Neurosurgery
Intubation
Neuroimaging
Epidemiology
Traumatic Brain Injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Television-Related Head Injuries in Children : A Secondary Analysis of a Large Cohort Study of Head-Injured Children in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network. / for the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN).

In: Pediatric Emergency Care, 06.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Television-Related Head Injuries in Children: A Secondary Analysis of a Large Cohort Study of Head-Injured Children in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology, cranial computed tomography (CT) findings, and clinical outcomes of children with blunt head trauma after television tip-over injuries. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of children younger than 18 years prospectively evaluated for blunt head trauma at 25 emergency departments (EDs) in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network from June 2004 to September 2006. Children injured from falling televisions were included. Patients were excluded if injuries occurred more than 24 hours before ED evaluation or if neuroimaging was obtained before evaluation. Data collected included age, race, sex, cranial CT findings, and clinical outcomes. Clinically important traumatic brain injuries (ciTBIs) were defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the TBI, or hospital admission of 2 nights or more for the head injury, in association with TBI on CT. RESULTS: A total of 43,904 children were enrolled into the primary study and 218 (0.5{\%}; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.4{\%} to 0.6{\%}) were struck by falling televisions. The median (interquartile range) age of the 218 patients was 3.1 (1.9–4.9) years. Seventy-five (34{\%}) of the 218 underwent CT scanning. Ten (13.3{\%}; 95{\%} CI, 6.6{\%} to 23.2{\%}) of the 75 patients with an ED CT had traumatic findings on cranial CT scan. Six patients met the criteria for ciTBI. Three of these patients died. All 6 patients with ciTBIs were younger than 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Television tip-overs may cause ciTBIs in children, including death, and the most severe injuries occur in children 5 years or younger. These injuries may be preventable by simple preventive measures such as anchoring television sets with straps.",
author = "{for the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN)} and Richard Lichenstein and David Monroe and Quayle, {Kimberly S.} and Michelle Miskin and Arthur Cooper and Gerardi, {Michael J.} and Callahan, {James M.} and Dayan, {Peter S.} and {Holmes Jr}, {James F} and Nathan Kuppermann",
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T2 - A Secondary Analysis of a Large Cohort Study of Head-Injured Children in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network

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AU - Lichenstein, Richard

AU - Monroe, David

AU - Quayle, Kimberly S.

AU - Miskin, Michelle

AU - Cooper, Arthur

AU - Gerardi, Michael J.

AU - Callahan, James M.

AU - Dayan, Peter S.

AU - Holmes Jr, James F

AU - Kuppermann, Nathan

PY - 2015/11/6

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology, cranial computed tomography (CT) findings, and clinical outcomes of children with blunt head trauma after television tip-over injuries. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of children younger than 18 years prospectively evaluated for blunt head trauma at 25 emergency departments (EDs) in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network from June 2004 to September 2006. Children injured from falling televisions were included. Patients were excluded if injuries occurred more than 24 hours before ED evaluation or if neuroimaging was obtained before evaluation. Data collected included age, race, sex, cranial CT findings, and clinical outcomes. Clinically important traumatic brain injuries (ciTBIs) were defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the TBI, or hospital admission of 2 nights or more for the head injury, in association with TBI on CT. RESULTS: A total of 43,904 children were enrolled into the primary study and 218 (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4% to 0.6%) were struck by falling televisions. The median (interquartile range) age of the 218 patients was 3.1 (1.9–4.9) years. Seventy-five (34%) of the 218 underwent CT scanning. Ten (13.3%; 95% CI, 6.6% to 23.2%) of the 75 patients with an ED CT had traumatic findings on cranial CT scan. Six patients met the criteria for ciTBI. Three of these patients died. All 6 patients with ciTBIs were younger than 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Television tip-overs may cause ciTBIs in children, including death, and the most severe injuries occur in children 5 years or younger. These injuries may be preventable by simple preventive measures such as anchoring television sets with straps.

AB - OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology, cranial computed tomography (CT) findings, and clinical outcomes of children with blunt head trauma after television tip-over injuries. METHODS: We performed a secondary analysis of children younger than 18 years prospectively evaluated for blunt head trauma at 25 emergency departments (EDs) in the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network from June 2004 to September 2006. Children injured from falling televisions were included. Patients were excluded if injuries occurred more than 24 hours before ED evaluation or if neuroimaging was obtained before evaluation. Data collected included age, race, sex, cranial CT findings, and clinical outcomes. Clinically important traumatic brain injuries (ciTBIs) were defined as death from TBI, neurosurgery, intubation for more than 24 hours for the TBI, or hospital admission of 2 nights or more for the head injury, in association with TBI on CT. RESULTS: A total of 43,904 children were enrolled into the primary study and 218 (0.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4% to 0.6%) were struck by falling televisions. The median (interquartile range) age of the 218 patients was 3.1 (1.9–4.9) years. Seventy-five (34%) of the 218 underwent CT scanning. Ten (13.3%; 95% CI, 6.6% to 23.2%) of the 75 patients with an ED CT had traumatic findings on cranial CT scan. Six patients met the criteria for ciTBI. Three of these patients died. All 6 patients with ciTBIs were younger than 5 years. CONCLUSIONS: Television tip-overs may cause ciTBIs in children, including death, and the most severe injuries occur in children 5 years or younger. These injuries may be preventable by simple preventive measures such as anchoring television sets with straps.

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