Telemonitoring for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A Systematic Review

Sarwat I. Chaudhry, Christopher O. Phillips, Simon S. Stewart, Barbara Riegel, Jennifer A. Mattera, Anthony F Jerant, Harlan M. Krumholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

161 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Telemonitoring, the use of communication technology to remotely monitor health status, is an appealing strategy for improving disease management. Methods and Results: We searched Medline databases, bibliographies, and spoke with experts to review the evidence on telemonitoring in heart failure patients. Interventions included: telephone-based symptom monitoring (n = 5), automated monitoring of signs and symptoms (n = 1), and automated physiologic monitoring (n = 1). Two studies directly compared effectiveness of 2 or more forms of telemonitoring. Study quality and intervention type varied considerably. Six studies suggested reduction in all-cause and heart failure hospitalizations (14% to 55% and 29% to 43%, respectively) or mortality (40% to 56%) with telemonitoring. Of the 3 negative studies, 2 enrolled low-risk patients and patients with access to high quality care, whereas 1 enrolled a very high-risk Hispanic population. Studies comparing forms of telemonitoring demonstrated similar effectiveness. However, intervention costs were higher with more complex programs ($8383 per patient per year) versus less complex programs ($1695 per patient per year). Conclusion: The evidence base for telemonitoring in heart failure is currently quite limited. Based on the available data, telemonitoring may be an effective strategy for disease management in high-risk heart failure patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Heart Failure
Disease Management
Quality of Health Care
Bibliography
Physiologic Monitoring
Hispanic Americans
Telephone
Health Status
Signs and Symptoms
Hospitalization
Communication
Databases
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • Disease management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Chaudhry, S. I., Phillips, C. O., Stewart, S. S., Riegel, B., Mattera, J. A., Jerant, A. F., & Krumholz, H. M. (2007). Telemonitoring for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A Systematic Review. Journal of Cardiac Failure, 13(1), 56-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2006.09.001

Telemonitoring for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure : A Systematic Review. / Chaudhry, Sarwat I.; Phillips, Christopher O.; Stewart, Simon S.; Riegel, Barbara; Mattera, Jennifer A.; Jerant, Anthony F; Krumholz, Harlan M.

In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, Vol. 13, No. 1, 02.2007, p. 56-62.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaudhry, SI, Phillips, CO, Stewart, SS, Riegel, B, Mattera, JA, Jerant, AF & Krumholz, HM 2007, 'Telemonitoring for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure: A Systematic Review', Journal of Cardiac Failure, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 56-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cardfail.2006.09.001
Chaudhry, Sarwat I. ; Phillips, Christopher O. ; Stewart, Simon S. ; Riegel, Barbara ; Mattera, Jennifer A. ; Jerant, Anthony F ; Krumholz, Harlan M. / Telemonitoring for Patients With Chronic Heart Failure : A Systematic Review. In: Journal of Cardiac Failure. 2007 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 56-62.
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