Teen dating violence perpetration and relation to STI and sexual risk behaviours among adolescent males

Elizabeth Reed, Elizabeth Miller, Anita Raj, Michele R. Decker, Jay G. Silverman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate teen dating violence (TDV) perpetration (physical, sexual or psychological violence) and association with STI and related sexual risk behaviours among urban male adolescents. Methods: Adolescent male survey participants (N=134) were aged 14-20 years, recruited from urban health centres. Using crude and adjusted logistic regression, TDV perpetration was examined in relation to self-reported: STI, having sex with another person when they were only supposed to have sex with their main partner, and consistent condom use. Results: Over one-third of males (45%) reported any TDV; 42% reported sexual violence perpetration, 13% reported perpetrating physical violence against a dating/sexual partner and 11% reported psychological violence, including threats of physical or sexual violence. Approximately 15% of males reported having ever had an STI, one quarter reported having sex with another person when they were only supposed to have sex with their main partner and 36% reported consistent condom use ( past 3 months). In adjusted logistic regression models, TDV perpetration was significantly associated with self-reports of an STI (OR=3.3; 95% CI 1.2 to 9.2) and having sex with another person when they were supposed to be only having sex with their main partner (OR=4.8; 95% CI 2.0 to 11.4). There was no significant association between TDV perpetration and consistent condom use. Conclusions: Current study findings are the first within the literature on adolescents to suggest that greater STI and sexual risk behaviours among male adolescents perpetrating TDV may be one mechanism explaining increased STI among female adolescents reporting TDV victimisation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)322-324
Number of pages3
JournalSexually Transmitted Infections
Volume90
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Risk-Taking
Sexual Behavior
Condoms
Logistic Models
Sex Offenses
Violence
Intimate Partner Violence
Psychology
Urban Health
Crime Victims
Sexual Partners
Self Report

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Teen dating violence perpetration and relation to STI and sexual risk behaviours among adolescent males. / Reed, Elizabeth; Miller, Elizabeth; Raj, Anita; Decker, Michele R.; Silverman, Jay G.

In: Sexually Transmitted Infections, Vol. 90, No. 4, 2014, p. 322-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Reed, Elizabeth ; Miller, Elizabeth ; Raj, Anita ; Decker, Michele R. ; Silverman, Jay G. / Teen dating violence perpetration and relation to STI and sexual risk behaviours among adolescent males. In: Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2014 ; Vol. 90, No. 4. pp. 322-324.
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