TEACHING CHILDREN WITH AUTISM APPROPRIATE PLAY IN UNSUPERVISED ENVIRONMENTS USING A SELF‐MANAGEMENT TREATMENT PACKAGE

Aubyn Stahmer, Laura Schreibman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

116 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study used a self‐management treatment package to teach 3 children with autism, who exhibited inappropriate play behaviors, to play appropriately in the absence of a treatment provider. After self‐management training, generalization and maintenance of the behavior change were assessed. Because of the detrimental effects of self‐stimulation (arm flapping, spinning toys, twirling, etc.) on learning, the relationship between self‐stimulatory behaviors and appropriate play was measured. Results indicated that the children learned to exhibit appropriate play skills in unsupervised settings, appropriate play skills generalized to new settings, and 2 of the children maintained their gains at 1‐month follow‐up. In addition, self‐stimulatory behaviors decreased as appropriate play increased. Treatment implications of these findings are discussed. 1992 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)447-459
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Behavior Analysis
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Keywords

  • appropriate play
  • autism
  • self‐management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Philosophy
  • Sociology and Political Science

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