Taurine depletion and cardiovascular disease in adult cats fed a potassium-depleted acidified diet.

S. W. Dow, M. J. Fettman, K. R. Smith, S. V. Ching, D. W. Hamar, Quinton Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Although low plasma taurine concentrations have been associated with congestive cardiomyopathy in cats, the cause of taurine depletion in cats consuming adequate quantities of taurine is unknown. Taurine depletion and cardiovascular disease (cardiomyopathy and thromboembolism) developed unexpectedly in 3 of 6 healthy adult cats during a potassium-depletion study. Plasma taurine concentration decreased significantly (P less than 0.05) and rapidly over an 8-week period (from 98 to 36 nmol/ml) in 6 cats that consumed a potassium-deficient diet (0.20% potassium, dry matter basis) that was acidified with 0.8% ammonium chloride, despite containing dietary taurine concentrations (0.12% dry matter basis) in excess of amounts currently recommended. Taurine concentrations were significantly lower in cats fed the acidified diet than in 6 cats fed a potassium-deficient diet that was not acidified (36 nmol/ml vs 75 nmol/ml) after 8 weeks. In addition, plasma taurine concentrations did not decrease over a 6-month period in 8 cats that were fed a potassium-replete diet with acidifier. Plasma taurine concentrations were lowest in 3 cats that died of cardiovascular disease in the group receiving potassium-deficient, acidified diets. These data indicated an association between taurine and potassium balance in cats and suggested that development of taurine depletion and cardiovascular disease may be linked to concurrent potassium depletion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-405
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Veterinary Research
Volume53
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Taurine
taurine
cardiovascular diseases
Potassium
Cats
Cardiovascular Diseases
potassium
cats
Diet
diet
cardiomyopathy
Ammonium Chloride
ammonium chloride
Thromboembolism
Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Cardiomyopathies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Taurine depletion and cardiovascular disease in adult cats fed a potassium-depleted acidified diet. / Dow, S. W.; Fettman, M. J.; Smith, K. R.; Ching, S. V.; Hamar, D. W.; Rogers, Quinton.

In: American Journal of Veterinary Research, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.03.1992, p. 402-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dow, S. W. ; Fettman, M. J. ; Smith, K. R. ; Ching, S. V. ; Hamar, D. W. ; Rogers, Quinton. / Taurine depletion and cardiovascular disease in adult cats fed a potassium-depleted acidified diet. In: American Journal of Veterinary Research. 1992 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 402-405.
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