Taurine deficiency in Newfoundlands fed commercially available complete and balanced diets

Robert C. Backus, Gabrielle Cohen, Paul D. Pion, Kathryn G Koehler, Quinton Rogers, Andrea J Fascetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective - To determine taurine status in a large group of Newfoundlands related by environment, diet, or breeding to a dog with dilated cardiomyopathy and taurine deficiency. Design - Prospective study. Animals - 19 privately owned Newfoundlands between 5 months and 11.5 years old that had been fed commercial dry diets meeting established nutrient recommendations. Procedure - Diet histories were obtained, and blood, plasma, and urine taurine concentrations and plasma methionine and cysteine concentrations were measured. In 8 dogs, taurine concentrations were measured before and after supplementation with methionine for 30 days. Ophthalmic examinations were performed in 16 dogs; echocardiography was performed in 6 dogs that were taurine deficient. Results - Plasma taurine concentrations ranged from 3 to 228 nmol/mL. Twelve dogs had concentrations < 40 nmol/mL and were considered taurine deficient. For dogs with plasma concentrations < 40 nmol/mL, there was a significant linear correlation between plasma and blood taurine concentrations. For dogs with plasma concentrations > 40 nmol/mL, blood taurine concentrations did not vary substantially. Taurine-deficient dogs had been fed lamb meal and rice diets. Retinal degeneration, dilated cardiomyopathy, and cystinuria were not found in any dog examined for these conditions. The taurine deficiency was reversed by a change in diet or methionine supplementation. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance - Results indicate a high prevalence of taurine deficiency among an environmentally and genetically related cohort of Newfoundlands fed apparently complete and balanced diets. Blood taurine concentrations indicative of taurine deficiency in Newfoundlands may be substantially less than concentrations indicative of a deficiency in cats.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1130-1136
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume223
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2003

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Newfoundland (dog breed)
Newfoundland and Labrador
Taurine
taurine
Diet
diet
Dogs
dogs
Methionine
methionine
cardiomyopathy
Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Cystinuria
diet history
Retinal Degeneration
echocardiography
blood
prospective studies
blood plasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Taurine deficiency in Newfoundlands fed commercially available complete and balanced diets. / Backus, Robert C.; Cohen, Gabrielle; Pion, Paul D.; Koehler, Kathryn G; Rogers, Quinton; Fascetti, Andrea J.

In: Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, Vol. 223, No. 8, 15.10.2003, p. 1130-1136.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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