T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with abnormal body weight: Longitudinal studies in anorexia nervosa and obesity

Sharon Fink, Elke Eckert, James Mitchell, Ross Crosby, Claire Pomeroy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: In contrast to other types of starvation which are characterized by low CD4+ counts and increased susceptibility to infection, anorexia nervosa is not associated with an increase in infectious complications. To determine why infection risk of anorectics differs from that of other starving populations, we studied T-lymphocytes, including CD4+ and CD8+ phenotypes, in patients with anorexia nervosa, and for comparison, in dieting obese subjects. Methods: T-lymphocyte phenotypes were determined by flow cytometric analysis of monoclonal antibody-labeled cells obtained from patients with anorexia nervosa before and after successful therapy and weight gain, and in obese subjects before and after weight loss on a very- low-calorie diet. Results: Weight loss in anorectics and obese dieters was associated with normal CD4+ counts. Unexpectedly, CD8+ counts were low in anorectics, both before and after weight gain, and in obese subjects after (but not before) dieting. Discussion: Normal CD4+ counts in anorectics and obese dieters, despite marked weight loss, may explain the lack of increased infection risk in these eating-disordered patients, in contrast to other starving populations. The observation that CD8+ counts are low in anorectics with low and restored body weight and in obese patients after dieting has not been previously reported. The persistence of low CD8+ counts in anorectics even after weight gain suggests that some factors other than weight loss per se may be involved, possibly including effects due to stress, comorbid psychiatric conditions, or unidentified aspects of dysregulated pathophysiology secondary to disordered eating.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-305
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Appetite Depressants
anorexia nervosa
Anorexia Nervosa
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
longitudinal studies
dieting
Longitudinal Studies
obesity
weight loss
Obesity
T-lymphocytes
Body Weight
body weight
Weight Loss
eating disorders
weight gain
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Weight Gain
infection
very low calorie diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Food Science
  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with abnormal body weight : Longitudinal studies in anorexia nervosa and obesity. / Fink, Sharon; Eckert, Elke; Mitchell, James; Crosby, Ross; Pomeroy, Claire.

In: International Journal of Eating Disorders, Vol. 20, No. 3, 11.1996, p. 295-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fink, Sharon ; Eckert, Elke ; Mitchell, James ; Crosby, Ross ; Pomeroy, Claire. / T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with abnormal body weight : Longitudinal studies in anorexia nervosa and obesity. In: International Journal of Eating Disorders. 1996 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 295-305.
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