Systemic carbachol used in radiation-controlled focal brain pharmacology can decrease rat running

Michael P. Remler, William H. Marcussen, Karen Sigvardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiation-controlled focal brain pharmacology is a method to concentrate a neuropharmacologic agent in any selected portion of the brain by irradiating that selected area and thereby lowering the BBB in that area. Then, when a drug that does not cross the normal BBB is administered systematically, the drug will preferentially penetrate and act only in the selected part of the brain. Rats received 20 Gy to the brainstem and then were tested with normal 0.9% saline 1 ml/kg, GABA 400 mg/kg, taurine 200 mg/kg, carbachol 1 mg/kg, amphetamine 2 mg/kg, and bicuculline methiodide 27 mg/kg. Opening the BBB produced no change in the average amount of running following the injection of saline. With the BBB closed, carbachol, bicuculline methiodide and taurine produced no statistically significant effect compared to saline. Comparing the effects of a drug when the BBB is open to that of saline when the BBB is open showed no significant effect of bicuculline methiodide, taurine and GABA. Carbachol produced a 73% reduction, significant at p < .0001. Comparing a drug when the BBB is open to the same drug when the BBB is closed showed no significant effect of bicuculline methiodide, taurine and GABA. Carbachol produced a 65% reduction, significant at p < .001. This shows that radiation-controlled focal brain pharmacology with carbachol can decrease the complex behavior of running.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)151-156
Number of pages6
JournalLife Sciences
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Carbachol
Running
Taurine
Rats
Brain
Pharmacology
Radiation
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Amphetamine
Brain Stem
Injections
bicuculline methiodide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Systemic carbachol used in radiation-controlled focal brain pharmacology can decrease rat running. / Remler, Michael P.; Marcussen, William H.; Sigvardt, Karen.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 45, No. 2, 1989, p. 151-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Remler, Michael P. ; Marcussen, William H. ; Sigvardt, Karen. / Systemic carbachol used in radiation-controlled focal brain pharmacology can decrease rat running. In: Life Sciences. 1989 ; Vol. 45, No. 2. pp. 151-156.
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