Systemic arterial blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism

Theresa M. Ortega, Edward C Feldman, Richard W Nelson, Neil Willits, Larry D Cowgill

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81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine prevalence and severity of systemic arterial hypertension and proteinuria in dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism and to determine whether these abnormalities resolve with adequate management of the disease. Design: Case series and cohort study. Animals: 77 dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism examined once; 15 dogs examined before and after treatment. Results: Among dogs examined only once, hypertension was diagnosed in 21 of 26 dogs with untreated pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), 17 of 21 with inadequately controlled PDH, 8 of 16 with well-controlled PDH, 10 of 10 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 0 of 4 that had undergone adrenalectomy because of an adrenocortical tumor. Untreated dogs and dogs with inadequately controlled PDH had significantly higher blood pressures than did other dogs. Proteinuria was documented in 12 of 26 dogs with untreated PDH, 5 of 16 with inadequately controlled PDH, 3 of 14 with well-controlled PDH, 5 of 8 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 1 of 3 that had undergone adrenalectomy. Dogs with untreated PDH and dogs with an untreated adrenocortical tumor had higher urine protein/creatinine ratios than did dogs with well-controlled PDH. Among dogs evaluated before and after treatment, blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio did not change in 8 dogs with inadequately controlled hyperadrenocorticism, but decreased in 7 dogs with well-controlled disease. Clinical Implications: Results suggest that systemic hypertension and proteinuria are common in dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism and that successful treatment of hyperadrenocorticism will result in resolution of these abnormalities in many, but not all dogs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1724-1729
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Volume209
Issue number10
StatePublished - Nov 15 1996

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Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
hyperadrenocorticism
creatinine
blood pressure
Creatinine
Arterial Pressure
urine
Urine
Dogs
dogs
Proteins
proteins
hypertension
Proteinuria
Hypertension
neoplasms
Adrenalectomy
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

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title = "Systemic arterial blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism",
abstract = "Objective: To determine prevalence and severity of systemic arterial hypertension and proteinuria in dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism and to determine whether these abnormalities resolve with adequate management of the disease. Design: Case series and cohort study. Animals: 77 dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism examined once; 15 dogs examined before and after treatment. Results: Among dogs examined only once, hypertension was diagnosed in 21 of 26 dogs with untreated pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), 17 of 21 with inadequately controlled PDH, 8 of 16 with well-controlled PDH, 10 of 10 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 0 of 4 that had undergone adrenalectomy because of an adrenocortical tumor. Untreated dogs and dogs with inadequately controlled PDH had significantly higher blood pressures than did other dogs. Proteinuria was documented in 12 of 26 dogs with untreated PDH, 5 of 16 with inadequately controlled PDH, 3 of 14 with well-controlled PDH, 5 of 8 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 1 of 3 that had undergone adrenalectomy. Dogs with untreated PDH and dogs with an untreated adrenocortical tumor had higher urine protein/creatinine ratios than did dogs with well-controlled PDH. Among dogs evaluated before and after treatment, blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio did not change in 8 dogs with inadequately controlled hyperadrenocorticism, but decreased in 7 dogs with well-controlled disease. Clinical Implications: Results suggest that systemic hypertension and proteinuria are common in dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism and that successful treatment of hyperadrenocorticism will result in resolution of these abnormalities in many, but not all dogs.",
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AU - Feldman, Edward C

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AU - Willits, Neil

AU - Cowgill, Larry D

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N2 - Objective: To determine prevalence and severity of systemic arterial hypertension and proteinuria in dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism and to determine whether these abnormalities resolve with adequate management of the disease. Design: Case series and cohort study. Animals: 77 dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism examined once; 15 dogs examined before and after treatment. Results: Among dogs examined only once, hypertension was diagnosed in 21 of 26 dogs with untreated pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), 17 of 21 with inadequately controlled PDH, 8 of 16 with well-controlled PDH, 10 of 10 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 0 of 4 that had undergone adrenalectomy because of an adrenocortical tumor. Untreated dogs and dogs with inadequately controlled PDH had significantly higher blood pressures than did other dogs. Proteinuria was documented in 12 of 26 dogs with untreated PDH, 5 of 16 with inadequately controlled PDH, 3 of 14 with well-controlled PDH, 5 of 8 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 1 of 3 that had undergone adrenalectomy. Dogs with untreated PDH and dogs with an untreated adrenocortical tumor had higher urine protein/creatinine ratios than did dogs with well-controlled PDH. Among dogs evaluated before and after treatment, blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio did not change in 8 dogs with inadequately controlled hyperadrenocorticism, but decreased in 7 dogs with well-controlled disease. Clinical Implications: Results suggest that systemic hypertension and proteinuria are common in dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism and that successful treatment of hyperadrenocorticism will result in resolution of these abnormalities in many, but not all dogs.

AB - Objective: To determine prevalence and severity of systemic arterial hypertension and proteinuria in dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism and to determine whether these abnormalities resolve with adequate management of the disease. Design: Case series and cohort study. Animals: 77 dogs with naturally developing hyperadrenocorticism examined once; 15 dogs examined before and after treatment. Results: Among dogs examined only once, hypertension was diagnosed in 21 of 26 dogs with untreated pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), 17 of 21 with inadequately controlled PDH, 8 of 16 with well-controlled PDH, 10 of 10 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 0 of 4 that had undergone adrenalectomy because of an adrenocortical tumor. Untreated dogs and dogs with inadequately controlled PDH had significantly higher blood pressures than did other dogs. Proteinuria was documented in 12 of 26 dogs with untreated PDH, 5 of 16 with inadequately controlled PDH, 3 of 14 with well-controlled PDH, 5 of 8 with an untreated adrenocortical tumor, and 1 of 3 that had undergone adrenalectomy. Dogs with untreated PDH and dogs with an untreated adrenocortical tumor had higher urine protein/creatinine ratios than did dogs with well-controlled PDH. Among dogs evaluated before and after treatment, blood pressure and urine protein/creatinine ratio did not change in 8 dogs with inadequately controlled hyperadrenocorticism, but decreased in 7 dogs with well-controlled disease. Clinical Implications: Results suggest that systemic hypertension and proteinuria are common in dogs with untreated hyperadrenocorticism and that successful treatment of hyperadrenocorticism will result in resolution of these abnormalities in many, but not all dogs.

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