Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. IV. Protection by quenchers of reactive oxygen species

Darren L. Warren, Dallas M. Hyde, Jerold A Last

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In previous studies we have shown interactions between ozone and acidic respirable aerosols as evaluated by sensitive biochemical and quantitative morphological endpoints. In the present paper we have attempted to test the hypothesis that active oxygen specis might play a role in lung damage caused by ozone ± sulfuric acid aerosol. Rats were administered various scavengers of active oxygen species via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route before and during exposure to 0.12, 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of ozone ± 0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/m3 of sulfuric acid aerosol. Vitamin E, a lipid-soluble free radical scavenger, β-carotene (the precursor of vitamin A), a singlet oxygen scavenger, and dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger, were tested. Dimethylthiourea at doses of 50 - 500 mg/kg per day was able to protect rats from the effets of ozone, suggesting a role for hydrogen peroxide in ozone-induced lung damage in vivo. Neither vitamin E nor β-carotene at 100 mg/kg doses had any protective activity in our experiments, despite documentation of increased lung content of the scavengers in animals receiving these agents. These results suggest that water solubility may play a role in the efficacy of the scavenging agents under our exposure protocols. We conclude that: (1) hydrogen peroxide may be involved in ozone-induced lung damage; and (2) that lung injury by ozone and by ozone + sulfuric acid aerosol may share common pathways.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-133
Number of pages21
JournalToxicology
Volume53
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 16 1988

Fingerprint

Ozone
Aerosols
Rats
Reactive Oxygen Species
Lung
Hydrogen Peroxide
Carotenoids
Vitamin E
Singlet Oxygen
Free Radical Scavengers
Scavenging
Lung Injury
Vitamin A
Documentation
Solubility
Animals
Lipids
Water

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Fibrosis
  • Free radicals
  • Ozone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. IV. Protection by quenchers of reactive oxygen species. / Warren, Darren L.; Hyde, Dallas M.; Last, Jerold A.

In: Toxicology, Vol. 53, No. 1, 16.12.1988, p. 113-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7324cdaf7d8c46b1be7185a65a67bca1,
title = "Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. IV. Protection by quenchers of reactive oxygen species",
abstract = "In previous studies we have shown interactions between ozone and acidic respirable aerosols as evaluated by sensitive biochemical and quantitative morphological endpoints. In the present paper we have attempted to test the hypothesis that active oxygen specis might play a role in lung damage caused by ozone ± sulfuric acid aerosol. Rats were administered various scavengers of active oxygen species via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route before and during exposure to 0.12, 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of ozone ± 0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/m3 of sulfuric acid aerosol. Vitamin E, a lipid-soluble free radical scavenger, β-carotene (the precursor of vitamin A), a singlet oxygen scavenger, and dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger, were tested. Dimethylthiourea at doses of 50 - 500 mg/kg per day was able to protect rats from the effets of ozone, suggesting a role for hydrogen peroxide in ozone-induced lung damage in vivo. Neither vitamin E nor β-carotene at 100 mg/kg doses had any protective activity in our experiments, despite documentation of increased lung content of the scavengers in animals receiving these agents. These results suggest that water solubility may play a role in the efficacy of the scavenging agents under our exposure protocols. We conclude that: (1) hydrogen peroxide may be involved in ozone-induced lung damage; and (2) that lung injury by ozone and by ozone + sulfuric acid aerosol may share common pathways.",
keywords = "Air pollution, Fibrosis, Free radicals, Ozone",
author = "Warren, {Darren L.} and Hyde, {Dallas M.} and Last, {Jerold A}",
year = "1988",
month = "12",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1016/0300-483X(88)90241-7",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "53",
pages = "113--133",
journal = "Toxicology",
issn = "0300-483X",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Synergistic interaction of ozone and respirable aerosols on rat lungs. IV. Protection by quenchers of reactive oxygen species

AU - Warren, Darren L.

AU - Hyde, Dallas M.

AU - Last, Jerold A

PY - 1988/12/16

Y1 - 1988/12/16

N2 - In previous studies we have shown interactions between ozone and acidic respirable aerosols as evaluated by sensitive biochemical and quantitative morphological endpoints. In the present paper we have attempted to test the hypothesis that active oxygen specis might play a role in lung damage caused by ozone ± sulfuric acid aerosol. Rats were administered various scavengers of active oxygen species via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route before and during exposure to 0.12, 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of ozone ± 0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/m3 of sulfuric acid aerosol. Vitamin E, a lipid-soluble free radical scavenger, β-carotene (the precursor of vitamin A), a singlet oxygen scavenger, and dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger, were tested. Dimethylthiourea at doses of 50 - 500 mg/kg per day was able to protect rats from the effets of ozone, suggesting a role for hydrogen peroxide in ozone-induced lung damage in vivo. Neither vitamin E nor β-carotene at 100 mg/kg doses had any protective activity in our experiments, despite documentation of increased lung content of the scavengers in animals receiving these agents. These results suggest that water solubility may play a role in the efficacy of the scavenging agents under our exposure protocols. We conclude that: (1) hydrogen peroxide may be involved in ozone-induced lung damage; and (2) that lung injury by ozone and by ozone + sulfuric acid aerosol may share common pathways.

AB - In previous studies we have shown interactions between ozone and acidic respirable aerosols as evaluated by sensitive biochemical and quantitative morphological endpoints. In the present paper we have attempted to test the hypothesis that active oxygen specis might play a role in lung damage caused by ozone ± sulfuric acid aerosol. Rats were administered various scavengers of active oxygen species via the intraperitoneal (i.p.) route before and during exposure to 0.12, 0.20 or 0.64 ppm of ozone ± 0.04, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0 mg/m3 of sulfuric acid aerosol. Vitamin E, a lipid-soluble free radical scavenger, β-carotene (the precursor of vitamin A), a singlet oxygen scavenger, and dimethylthiourea, a hydrogen peroxide scavenger, were tested. Dimethylthiourea at doses of 50 - 500 mg/kg per day was able to protect rats from the effets of ozone, suggesting a role for hydrogen peroxide in ozone-induced lung damage in vivo. Neither vitamin E nor β-carotene at 100 mg/kg doses had any protective activity in our experiments, despite documentation of increased lung content of the scavengers in animals receiving these agents. These results suggest that water solubility may play a role in the efficacy of the scavenging agents under our exposure protocols. We conclude that: (1) hydrogen peroxide may be involved in ozone-induced lung damage; and (2) that lung injury by ozone and by ozone + sulfuric acid aerosol may share common pathways.

KW - Air pollution

KW - Fibrosis

KW - Free radicals

KW - Ozone

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024230402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024230402&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0300-483X(88)90241-7

DO - 10.1016/0300-483X(88)90241-7

M3 - Article

C2 - 3144057

AN - SCOPUS:0024230402

VL - 53

SP - 113

EP - 133

JO - Toxicology

JF - Toxicology

SN - 0300-483X

IS - 1

ER -