Survival of bovine embryos stored at 4°C

G. M. Lindner, G. B. Anderson, Robert Bondurant, P. T. Cupps

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These experiments were designed to test the efficacy of storing bovine embryos at 4°C. Of particular interest were the age of embryo at which maximum post-storage survival could be achieved and longevity at 4°C. A greater proportion of day 8 blastocysts developed in vitro at 37°C following refrigeration for 48 hr than did embryos collected 2, 4 or 6 days after estrus (P<0.01). Survival of blastocysts stored at 4°C for 48 hr was similar to that of nonstored blastocysts. In a subsequent experiment, day 8 blastocysts were recovered nonsurgically and assigned to one of the following treatments: (a) immediate transfer; (b) culture at 37°C; or (c) storage at 4°C for 1, 2, 3 or 5 days. Post-storage viability was assessed by either development in culture at 37°C or embryo survival following nonsurgical transfer to synchronized recipients. In vitro survival of nonstored embryos and embryos stored 1 day did not differ. Survival decreased after storage for 2 days (P<0.10) or longer (P<0.05). Similar results were observed for survival after transfer, but embryo viability decreased even more rapidly with increasing duration of storage. In vitro survival was approximately 50% for blastocysts stored for 3 and 5 days, but few pregnancies resulted from transfer of embryos stored for these periods. In another experiment survival after transfer of blastocysts stored at 4°C for up to 2 days was similar to that of nonstored blastocysts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalTheriogenology
Volume20
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

Fingerprint

Blastocyst
blastocyst
embryo (animal)
Embryonic Structures
Embryo Transfer
cattle
embryo transfer
viability
Refrigeration
Estrus
refrigeration
estrus
storage time
Pregnancy
pregnancy
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals
  • Food Animals
  • Equine
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Lindner, G. M., Anderson, G. B., Bondurant, R., & Cupps, P. T. (1983). Survival of bovine embryos stored at 4°C. Theriogenology, 20(3), 311-319. https://doi.org/10.1016/0093-691X(83)90064-X

Survival of bovine embryos stored at 4°C. / Lindner, G. M.; Anderson, G. B.; Bondurant, Robert; Cupps, P. T.

In: Theriogenology, Vol. 20, No. 3, 01.01.1983, p. 311-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lindner, GM, Anderson, GB, Bondurant, R & Cupps, PT 1983, 'Survival of bovine embryos stored at 4°C', Theriogenology, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 311-319. https://doi.org/10.1016/0093-691X(83)90064-X
Lindner, G. M. ; Anderson, G. B. ; Bondurant, Robert ; Cupps, P. T. / Survival of bovine embryos stored at 4°C. In: Theriogenology. 1983 ; Vol. 20, No. 3. pp. 311-319.
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