Survival, neurologic response, and prognostic factors in dogs with pituitary masses treated with radiation therapy and untreated dogs

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Abstract

Background: Pituitary masses in dogs are not uncommon tumors that can cause endocrine and neurologic signs and, if left untreated, can decrease life expectancy. Hypothesis: Dogs with pituitary masses that received radiation therapy (RT) have more favorable neurologic outcomes and longer survival times compared with untreated dogs. Animals: Nineteen dogs with a pituitary mass identified on CT or MR imaging were irradiated with 48 Gy given in 3 Gy daily-dose fractions. Twenty-seven untreated control dogs had pituitary masses. Methods: Medical records of dogs with pituitary masses were retrospectively reviewed for clinical signs, mass size, and outcome. Results: Median survival time was not reached in the treated group. Mean survival time in the treated group was 1,405 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,053-1,757 days) with 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival of 93, 87, and 55%, respectively. Median survival in the nonirradiated group was 359 days (95% CI, 48-916 days), with a mean of 551 days (95% CI, 271-829 days). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival was 45, 32, and 25%, respectively. Dogs that received RT for their pituitary tumors had significantly longer survival times than untreated dogs (P = .0039). Treated dogs with smaller tumors (based on maximal pituitary-to-brain height ratio or area of tumor to area of brain) lived longer than those with larger tumors (P < .001). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: When compared with untreated dogs, RT increased survival and controlled neurologic signs in dogs with pituitary masses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1027-1033
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

radiotherapy
nervous system
Nervous System
Radiotherapy
Dogs
dogs
neoplasms
confidence interval
Confidence Intervals
Neurologic Manifestations
Neoplasms
brain
Brain
Pituitary Neoplasms
Life Expectancy
Medical Records
Survival Rate
image analysis

Keywords

  • Canine
  • Macroadenoma
  • Macrotumor
  • Pituitary tumor
  • Radiation therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

@article{f6b2022f2b254be084521b924708756a,
title = "Survival, neurologic response, and prognostic factors in dogs with pituitary masses treated with radiation therapy and untreated dogs",
abstract = "Background: Pituitary masses in dogs are not uncommon tumors that can cause endocrine and neurologic signs and, if left untreated, can decrease life expectancy. Hypothesis: Dogs with pituitary masses that received radiation therapy (RT) have more favorable neurologic outcomes and longer survival times compared with untreated dogs. Animals: Nineteen dogs with a pituitary mass identified on CT or MR imaging were irradiated with 48 Gy given in 3 Gy daily-dose fractions. Twenty-seven untreated control dogs had pituitary masses. Methods: Medical records of dogs with pituitary masses were retrospectively reviewed for clinical signs, mass size, and outcome. Results: Median survival time was not reached in the treated group. Mean survival time in the treated group was 1,405 days (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1,053-1,757 days) with 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival of 93, 87, and 55{\%}, respectively. Median survival in the nonirradiated group was 359 days (95{\%} CI, 48-916 days), with a mean of 551 days (95{\%} CI, 271-829 days). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival was 45, 32, and 25{\%}, respectively. Dogs that received RT for their pituitary tumors had significantly longer survival times than untreated dogs (P = .0039). Treated dogs with smaller tumors (based on maximal pituitary-to-brain height ratio or area of tumor to area of brain) lived longer than those with larger tumors (P < .001). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: When compared with untreated dogs, RT increased survival and controlled neurologic signs in dogs with pituitary masses.",
keywords = "Canine, Macroadenoma, Macrotumor, Pituitary tumor, Radiation therapy",
author = "Kent, {Michael S} and David Bommarito and Feldman, {Edward C} and Theon, {Alain P}",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1892/0891-6640(2007)21[1027:SNRAPF]2.0.CO;2",
language = "English (US)",
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pages = "1027--1033",
journal = "Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine",
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T1 - Survival, neurologic response, and prognostic factors in dogs with pituitary masses treated with radiation therapy and untreated dogs

AU - Kent, Michael S

AU - Bommarito, David

AU - Feldman, Edward C

AU - Theon, Alain P

PY - 2007/9

Y1 - 2007/9

N2 - Background: Pituitary masses in dogs are not uncommon tumors that can cause endocrine and neurologic signs and, if left untreated, can decrease life expectancy. Hypothesis: Dogs with pituitary masses that received radiation therapy (RT) have more favorable neurologic outcomes and longer survival times compared with untreated dogs. Animals: Nineteen dogs with a pituitary mass identified on CT or MR imaging were irradiated with 48 Gy given in 3 Gy daily-dose fractions. Twenty-seven untreated control dogs had pituitary masses. Methods: Medical records of dogs with pituitary masses were retrospectively reviewed for clinical signs, mass size, and outcome. Results: Median survival time was not reached in the treated group. Mean survival time in the treated group was 1,405 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,053-1,757 days) with 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival of 93, 87, and 55%, respectively. Median survival in the nonirradiated group was 359 days (95% CI, 48-916 days), with a mean of 551 days (95% CI, 271-829 days). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival was 45, 32, and 25%, respectively. Dogs that received RT for their pituitary tumors had significantly longer survival times than untreated dogs (P = .0039). Treated dogs with smaller tumors (based on maximal pituitary-to-brain height ratio or area of tumor to area of brain) lived longer than those with larger tumors (P < .001). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: When compared with untreated dogs, RT increased survival and controlled neurologic signs in dogs with pituitary masses.

AB - Background: Pituitary masses in dogs are not uncommon tumors that can cause endocrine and neurologic signs and, if left untreated, can decrease life expectancy. Hypothesis: Dogs with pituitary masses that received radiation therapy (RT) have more favorable neurologic outcomes and longer survival times compared with untreated dogs. Animals: Nineteen dogs with a pituitary mass identified on CT or MR imaging were irradiated with 48 Gy given in 3 Gy daily-dose fractions. Twenty-seven untreated control dogs had pituitary masses. Methods: Medical records of dogs with pituitary masses were retrospectively reviewed for clinical signs, mass size, and outcome. Results: Median survival time was not reached in the treated group. Mean survival time in the treated group was 1,405 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,053-1,757 days) with 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival of 93, 87, and 55%, respectively. Median survival in the nonirradiated group was 359 days (95% CI, 48-916 days), with a mean of 551 days (95% CI, 271-829 days). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year estimated survival was 45, 32, and 25%, respectively. Dogs that received RT for their pituitary tumors had significantly longer survival times than untreated dogs (P = .0039). Treated dogs with smaller tumors (based on maximal pituitary-to-brain height ratio or area of tumor to area of brain) lived longer than those with larger tumors (P < .001). Conclusions and Clinical Importance: When compared with untreated dogs, RT increased survival and controlled neurologic signs in dogs with pituitary masses.

KW - Canine

KW - Macroadenoma

KW - Macrotumor

KW - Pituitary tumor

KW - Radiation therapy

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