Survival difference between non-hispanic black and non-hispanic white women with localized breast cancer: The impact of guideline-concordant therapy

Xiaocheng Wu, Lisa C. Richardson, Amy R. Kahn, John P. Fulton, Rosemary D Cress, Tiefu Shen, Holly J. Wolf, Susan Bolick-Aldrich, Vivien W. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study examined the impact of guideline-concordant therapy on the survival difference between non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women with localized breast cancer. Methods: Data analyzed were from the CDC's NPCR Patterns of Care study in which seven population-based state cancer registries participated. We randomly selected 2,362 women who were diagnosed with a first primary localized breast cancer in 1997. Data were abstracted from hospital records, supplemented by information from physician offices and by linkages with state vital records and the National Death Index database. Results: NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive breast conserving surgery without radiation therapy. In addition, the percentage of NHB women with hormone receptor-positive tumors who received hormonal therapy was lower than that of NHW women. Among those with a tumor size >3 cm, NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive multiagent chemotherapy. After controlling for age, the risk of dying from all causes of death was 2.35 times as high for NHB women compared to NHW women. Controlling for treatment further reduced black-white difference in survival with adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusion: NHB women were less likely than NHW women to receive guideline-concordant radiation therapy after breast conserving therapy and hormonal therapy but were more likely to receive chemotherapy. Racial differences in treatment contribute significantly to the worse survival of NHB women compared with NHW women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)490-498
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume100
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2008

Fingerprint

Guidelines
Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Therapeutics
Radiotherapy
Drug Therapy
Physicians' Offices
Neoplasms
Death Certificates
Segmental Mastectomy
Hospital Records
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Registries
Cause of Death
Breast
Databases
Hormones

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Survival difference between non-hispanic black and non-hispanic white women with localized breast cancer : The impact of guideline-concordant therapy. / Wu, Xiaocheng; Richardson, Lisa C.; Kahn, Amy R.; Fulton, John P.; Cress, Rosemary D; Shen, Tiefu; Wolf, Holly J.; Bolick-Aldrich, Susan; Chen, Vivien W.

In: Journal of the National Medical Association, Vol. 100, No. 5, 05.2008, p. 490-498.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wu, Xiaocheng ; Richardson, Lisa C. ; Kahn, Amy R. ; Fulton, John P. ; Cress, Rosemary D ; Shen, Tiefu ; Wolf, Holly J. ; Bolick-Aldrich, Susan ; Chen, Vivien W. / Survival difference between non-hispanic black and non-hispanic white women with localized breast cancer : The impact of guideline-concordant therapy. In: Journal of the National Medical Association. 2008 ; Vol. 100, No. 5. pp. 490-498.
@article{8dca6a49af304fc8b7dd2a55be7b3b96,
title = "Survival difference between non-hispanic black and non-hispanic white women with localized breast cancer: The impact of guideline-concordant therapy",
abstract = "Objectives: This study examined the impact of guideline-concordant therapy on the survival difference between non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women with localized breast cancer. Methods: Data analyzed were from the CDC's NPCR Patterns of Care study in which seven population-based state cancer registries participated. We randomly selected 2,362 women who were diagnosed with a first primary localized breast cancer in 1997. Data were abstracted from hospital records, supplemented by information from physician offices and by linkages with state vital records and the National Death Index database. Results: NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive breast conserving surgery without radiation therapy. In addition, the percentage of NHB women with hormone receptor-positive tumors who received hormonal therapy was lower than that of NHW women. Among those with a tumor size >3 cm, NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive multiagent chemotherapy. After controlling for age, the risk of dying from all causes of death was 2.35 times as high for NHB women compared to NHW women. Controlling for treatment further reduced black-white difference in survival with adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusion: NHB women were less likely than NHW women to receive guideline-concordant radiation therapy after breast conserving therapy and hormonal therapy but were more likely to receive chemotherapy. Racial differences in treatment contribute significantly to the worse survival of NHB women compared with NHW women.",
keywords = "Breast cancer, Cancer, Chemotherapy, Race/ethnicity, Survival",
author = "Xiaocheng Wu and Richardson, {Lisa C.} and Kahn, {Amy R.} and Fulton, {John P.} and Cress, {Rosemary D} and Tiefu Shen and Wolf, {Holly J.} and Susan Bolick-Aldrich and Chen, {Vivien W.}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "490--498",
journal = "Journal of the National Medical Association",
issn = "1943-4693",
publisher = "National Medical Association",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Survival difference between non-hispanic black and non-hispanic white women with localized breast cancer

T2 - The impact of guideline-concordant therapy

AU - Wu, Xiaocheng

AU - Richardson, Lisa C.

AU - Kahn, Amy R.

AU - Fulton, John P.

AU - Cress, Rosemary D

AU - Shen, Tiefu

AU - Wolf, Holly J.

AU - Bolick-Aldrich, Susan

AU - Chen, Vivien W.

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - Objectives: This study examined the impact of guideline-concordant therapy on the survival difference between non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women with localized breast cancer. Methods: Data analyzed were from the CDC's NPCR Patterns of Care study in which seven population-based state cancer registries participated. We randomly selected 2,362 women who were diagnosed with a first primary localized breast cancer in 1997. Data were abstracted from hospital records, supplemented by information from physician offices and by linkages with state vital records and the National Death Index database. Results: NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive breast conserving surgery without radiation therapy. In addition, the percentage of NHB women with hormone receptor-positive tumors who received hormonal therapy was lower than that of NHW women. Among those with a tumor size >3 cm, NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive multiagent chemotherapy. After controlling for age, the risk of dying from all causes of death was 2.35 times as high for NHB women compared to NHW women. Controlling for treatment further reduced black-white difference in survival with adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusion: NHB women were less likely than NHW women to receive guideline-concordant radiation therapy after breast conserving therapy and hormonal therapy but were more likely to receive chemotherapy. Racial differences in treatment contribute significantly to the worse survival of NHB women compared with NHW women.

AB - Objectives: This study examined the impact of guideline-concordant therapy on the survival difference between non-Hispanic black (NHB) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) women with localized breast cancer. Methods: Data analyzed were from the CDC's NPCR Patterns of Care study in which seven population-based state cancer registries participated. We randomly selected 2,362 women who were diagnosed with a first primary localized breast cancer in 1997. Data were abstracted from hospital records, supplemented by information from physician offices and by linkages with state vital records and the National Death Index database. Results: NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive breast conserving surgery without radiation therapy. In addition, the percentage of NHB women with hormone receptor-positive tumors who received hormonal therapy was lower than that of NHW women. Among those with a tumor size >3 cm, NHB women were more likely than NHW women to receive multiagent chemotherapy. After controlling for age, the risk of dying from all causes of death was 2.35 times as high for NHB women compared to NHW women. Controlling for treatment further reduced black-white difference in survival with adjustment for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusion: NHB women were less likely than NHW women to receive guideline-concordant radiation therapy after breast conserving therapy and hormonal therapy but were more likely to receive chemotherapy. Racial differences in treatment contribute significantly to the worse survival of NHB women compared with NHW women.

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Cancer

KW - Chemotherapy

KW - Race/ethnicity

KW - Survival

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44149101982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44149101982&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 18507201

AN - SCOPUS:44149101982

VL - 100

SP - 490

EP - 498

JO - Journal of the National Medical Association

JF - Journal of the National Medical Association

SN - 1943-4693

IS - 5

ER -