Surveillance imaging following definitive radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

What is the clinical impact?

Brandon A. Dyer, Megan E Daly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence rates at all stages are high, but evidence-based post-treatment surveillance imaging strategies to detect recurrence are poorly defined, and salvage options are frequently limited. A number of national and international oncology guidelines address post-treatment imaging, but are largely based on low-level, retrospective evidence because of a paucity of high-quality data, particularly in regard to cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life endpoints. Given the lack of randomized data addressing appropriate surveillance imaging modality and interval following definitive treatment of lung cancer, there remains an unmet clinical need. Meaningful surveillance endpoints should include the financial impact, patient quality-of-life outcomes, and access-to-care issues associated with intensive follow-up to ensure that guidelines reflect quality and sustainability. A need for prospective randomized data on the subject of imaging surveillance after definitive local therapy remains an unmet need, and an opportunity for collaboration and further research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSeminars in Oncology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma
Radiotherapy
Lung Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Guidelines
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cause of Death
Research
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Lung cancer
  • Radiotherapy
  • Surveillance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Surveillance imaging following definitive radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: What is the clinical impact?",
abstract = "Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Recurrence rates at all stages are high, but evidence-based post-treatment surveillance imaging strategies to detect recurrence are poorly defined, and salvage options are frequently limited. A number of national and international oncology guidelines address post-treatment imaging, but are largely based on low-level, retrospective evidence because of a paucity of high-quality data, particularly in regard to cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life endpoints. Given the lack of randomized data addressing appropriate surveillance imaging modality and interval following definitive treatment of lung cancer, there remains an unmet clinical need. Meaningful surveillance endpoints should include the financial impact, patient quality-of-life outcomes, and access-to-care issues associated with intensive follow-up to ensure that guidelines reflect quality and sustainability. A need for prospective randomized data on the subject of imaging surveillance after definitive local therapy remains an unmet need, and an opportunity for collaboration and further research.",
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