Surgical training and global health: Initial results of a 5-year partnership with a surgical training program in a low-income country

Doruk Ozgediz, Jennifer Wang, Sudha Jayaraman, Alex Ayzengart, Ramin Jamshidi, Michael Lipnick, Jacqueline Mabweijano, Sam Kaggwa, Margaret Knudson, William Schecter, Diana L Farmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypothesis: Surgical trainees in the United States have a growing interest in both clinical experiences and structured training opportunities in global health. Global health training and exposure can be integrated into a surgical residency program. Design: The global health activities of surgical residents and faculty in 1 department were evaluated from January 1,1998, to June 1, 2008, using a survey and personal interviews. Results: From January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2002, 4 faculty members made more than 20 overseas volunteer medical expeditions, but only 1 resident participated in global health activities. In 2003, a relationship with a surgical training program in a developing country was established. Ten residents and 12 faculty members have made overseas trips during the last 5 years, and 1 international surgeon has visited the United States. During their research block, 4 residents completed 1- to 3-month clinical rotations and contributed to mentored research projects. Three residents completed a university-based Global Health Clinical Scholars Program, and 3 obtained master's degrees in public health. A joint conference in injury-trauma research was also conducted. A faculty member is based overseas with clinical and research responsibilities, and another is completing a master's degree in public health. Conclusions: Global health training and exposure for residents can be effectively integrated into an academic surgical residency program through relationships with training programs in low-income countries. Legitimate academic experiences improve the success of these programs. Reciprocity with collaborative partners must be ensured, and sustained commitment and funding remain a great challenge to such programs. The long-term effect on the development of global health careers is yet to be determined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)860-865
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume143
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Education
Internship and Residency
Research
Public Health
Expeditions
Wounds and Injuries
Global Health
Developing Countries
Volunteers
Joints
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgical training and global health : Initial results of a 5-year partnership with a surgical training program in a low-income country. / Ozgediz, Doruk; Wang, Jennifer; Jayaraman, Sudha; Ayzengart, Alex; Jamshidi, Ramin; Lipnick, Michael; Mabweijano, Jacqueline; Kaggwa, Sam; Knudson, Margaret; Schecter, William; Farmer, Diana L.

In: Archives of Surgery, Vol. 143, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 860-865.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ozgediz, D, Wang, J, Jayaraman, S, Ayzengart, A, Jamshidi, R, Lipnick, M, Mabweijano, J, Kaggwa, S, Knudson, M, Schecter, W & Farmer, DL 2008, 'Surgical training and global health: Initial results of a 5-year partnership with a surgical training program in a low-income country', Archives of Surgery, vol. 143, no. 9, pp. 860-865. https://doi.org/10.1001/archsurg.143.9.860
Ozgediz, Doruk ; Wang, Jennifer ; Jayaraman, Sudha ; Ayzengart, Alex ; Jamshidi, Ramin ; Lipnick, Michael ; Mabweijano, Jacqueline ; Kaggwa, Sam ; Knudson, Margaret ; Schecter, William ; Farmer, Diana L. / Surgical training and global health : Initial results of a 5-year partnership with a surgical training program in a low-income country. In: Archives of Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 143, No. 9. pp. 860-865.
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