Superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the management of bullous keratopathy

Validation in dogs with spontaneous disease

Taemi Horikawa, Sara M Thomasy, Amelia A. Stanley, Allison S. Calderon, Jennifer Li, Lana L. Linton, Christopher J Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the treatment of bullous keratopathy in canine patients. Methods: Nine dogs (12 eyes) diagnosed with progressive corneal edema underwent superficial keratectomy followed by placement of conjunctival advancement hood flaps. The canine patients were examined pre- and postoperatively using in vivo confocal microscopy, ultrasonic pachymetry (USP), and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). All owners responded to a survey regarding treatment outcomes. Results: Mean central corneal thickness (CCT) as measured by FDOCT was 1163 ± 290 mm preoperatively and significantly decreased postoperatively to 795 ± 197 mm (P = 0.001), 869 ± 190 mm (P = 0.005), and 969 ± 162 mm (P = 0.033) at median postoperative evaluations occurring at 2.2, 6.8, and 12.3 months, respectively. Owners reported significant improvement (P < 0.05) in vision and corneal cloudiness at 6.8 and 12.3 months postoperatively. The percentage of cornea covered by the conjunctival flap was correlated (P = 0.0159) with a reduction in CCT by USP at 12.3 months postoperatively. All canine patients were comfortable pre- and postoperatively. Conclusions: SKCAHF results in a reduction of corneal thickness in canine patients with bullous keratopathy. The increase in corneal thickness over time, after performing SKCAHF, is likely because of progressive endothelial decompensation. This surgery is a potentially effective intervention for progressive corneal edema in dogs that may have value in treatment of human patients with bullous keratopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1295-1304
Number of pages10
JournalCornea
Volume35
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Dogs
Canidae
Corneal Edema
Ultrasonics
Optical Coherence Tomography
Confocal Microscopy
Cornea
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Bullous keratopathy
  • Canine corneal endothelial dystrophy
  • Conjunctival flap
  • Corneal edema
  • Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the management of bullous keratopathy : Validation in dogs with spontaneous disease. / Horikawa, Taemi; Thomasy, Sara M; Stanley, Amelia A.; Calderon, Allison S.; Li, Jennifer; Linton, Lana L.; Murphy, Christopher J.

In: Cornea, Vol. 35, No. 10, 2016, p. 1295-1304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the treatment of bullous keratopathy in canine patients. Methods: Nine dogs (12 eyes) diagnosed with progressive corneal edema underwent superficial keratectomy followed by placement of conjunctival advancement hood flaps. The canine patients were examined pre- and postoperatively using in vivo confocal microscopy, ultrasonic pachymetry (USP), and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). All owners responded to a survey regarding treatment outcomes. Results: Mean central corneal thickness (CCT) as measured by FDOCT was 1163 ± 290 mm preoperatively and significantly decreased postoperatively to 795 ± 197 mm (P = 0.001), 869 ± 190 mm (P = 0.005), and 969 ± 162 mm (P = 0.033) at median postoperative evaluations occurring at 2.2, 6.8, and 12.3 months, respectively. Owners reported significant improvement (P < 0.05) in vision and corneal cloudiness at 6.8 and 12.3 months postoperatively. The percentage of cornea covered by the conjunctival flap was correlated (P = 0.0159) with a reduction in CCT by USP at 12.3 months postoperatively. All canine patients were comfortable pre- and postoperatively. Conclusions: SKCAHF results in a reduction of corneal thickness in canine patients with bullous keratopathy. The increase in corneal thickness over time, after performing SKCAHF, is likely because of progressive endothelial decompensation. This surgery is a potentially effective intervention for progressive corneal edema in dogs that may have value in treatment of human patients with bullous keratopathy.",
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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the treatment of bullous keratopathy in canine patients. Methods: Nine dogs (12 eyes) diagnosed with progressive corneal edema underwent superficial keratectomy followed by placement of conjunctival advancement hood flaps. The canine patients were examined pre- and postoperatively using in vivo confocal microscopy, ultrasonic pachymetry (USP), and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). All owners responded to a survey regarding treatment outcomes. Results: Mean central corneal thickness (CCT) as measured by FDOCT was 1163 ± 290 mm preoperatively and significantly decreased postoperatively to 795 ± 197 mm (P = 0.001), 869 ± 190 mm (P = 0.005), and 969 ± 162 mm (P = 0.033) at median postoperative evaluations occurring at 2.2, 6.8, and 12.3 months, respectively. Owners reported significant improvement (P < 0.05) in vision and corneal cloudiness at 6.8 and 12.3 months postoperatively. The percentage of cornea covered by the conjunctival flap was correlated (P = 0.0159) with a reduction in CCT by USP at 12.3 months postoperatively. All canine patients were comfortable pre- and postoperatively. Conclusions: SKCAHF results in a reduction of corneal thickness in canine patients with bullous keratopathy. The increase in corneal thickness over time, after performing SKCAHF, is likely because of progressive endothelial decompensation. This surgery is a potentially effective intervention for progressive corneal edema in dogs that may have value in treatment of human patients with bullous keratopathy.

AB - Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of superficial keratectomy and conjunctival advancement hood flap (SKCAHF) for the treatment of bullous keratopathy in canine patients. Methods: Nine dogs (12 eyes) diagnosed with progressive corneal edema underwent superficial keratectomy followed by placement of conjunctival advancement hood flaps. The canine patients were examined pre- and postoperatively using in vivo confocal microscopy, ultrasonic pachymetry (USP), and Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT). All owners responded to a survey regarding treatment outcomes. Results: Mean central corneal thickness (CCT) as measured by FDOCT was 1163 ± 290 mm preoperatively and significantly decreased postoperatively to 795 ± 197 mm (P = 0.001), 869 ± 190 mm (P = 0.005), and 969 ± 162 mm (P = 0.033) at median postoperative evaluations occurring at 2.2, 6.8, and 12.3 months, respectively. Owners reported significant improvement (P < 0.05) in vision and corneal cloudiness at 6.8 and 12.3 months postoperatively. The percentage of cornea covered by the conjunctival flap was correlated (P = 0.0159) with a reduction in CCT by USP at 12.3 months postoperatively. All canine patients were comfortable pre- and postoperatively. Conclusions: SKCAHF results in a reduction of corneal thickness in canine patients with bullous keratopathy. The increase in corneal thickness over time, after performing SKCAHF, is likely because of progressive endothelial decompensation. This surgery is a potentially effective intervention for progressive corneal edema in dogs that may have value in treatment of human patients with bullous keratopathy.

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