Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Serum Uric Acid, and Blood Pressure in Adolescents

Stephanie Nguyen, Hyon K. Choi, Robert H. Lustig, Chi yuan Hsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

203 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate whether sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, a significant source of dietary fructose, is associated with higher serum uric acid levels and blood pressure in adolescents. Study design: We analyzed cross-sectional data from 4867 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004. Dietary data were assessed from 24-hour dietary recall interviews. Sugar-sweetened beverages included fruit drinks, sports drinks, soda, and sweetened coffee or tea. We used multivariate linear regression to evaluate the association of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption with serum uric acid and with blood pressure. Results: Adolescents who drank more sugar-sweetened beverages tended to be older and male. In the adjusted model, serum uric acid increased by 0.18 mg/dL and systolic blood pressure z-score increased by 0.17 from the lowest to the highest category of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (P for trend, .01 and .03, respectively). Conclusions: These results from a nationally representative sample of US adolescents indicate that higher sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is associated with higher serum uric acid levels and systolic blood pressure, which may lead to downstream adverse health outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)807-813
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume154
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Beverages
Uric Acid
Blood Pressure
Serum
Nutrition Surveys
Coffee
Tea
Fructose
Sports
Linear Models
Fruit
Interviews
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Serum Uric Acid, and Blood Pressure in Adolescents. / Nguyen, Stephanie; Choi, Hyon K.; Lustig, Robert H.; Hsu, Chi yuan.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 154, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 807-813.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nguyen, Stephanie ; Choi, Hyon K. ; Lustig, Robert H. ; Hsu, Chi yuan. / Sugar-Sweetened Beverages, Serum Uric Acid, and Blood Pressure in Adolescents. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2009 ; Vol. 154, No. 6. pp. 807-813.
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