Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) - a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy

András M. Komáromy, Kenneth L. Abrams, John R. Heckenlively, Steven K. Lundy, David J Maggs, Caroline M. Leeth, Puliyur S. MohanKumar, Simon M. Petersen-Jones, David V. Serreze, Alexandra van der Woerdt

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) is one of the leading causes of currently incurable canine vision loss diagnosed by veterinary ophthalmologists. The disease is characterized by acute onset of blindness due to loss of photoreceptor function, extinguished electroretinogram with an initially normal appearing ocular fundus, and mydriatic pupils which are slowly responsive to bright white light, unresponsive to red, but responsive to blue light stimulation. In addition to blindness, the majority of affected dogs also show systemic abnormalities suggestive of hyperadrenocorticism, such as polyphagia with resulting obesity, polyuria, polydipsia, and a subclinical hepatopathy. The pathogenesis of SARDS is unknown, but neuroendocrine and autoimmune mechanisms have been suggested. Therapies that target these disease pathways have been proposed to reverse or prevent further vision loss in SARDS-affected dogs, but these treatments are controversial. In November 2014, the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists' Vision for Animals Foundation organized and funded a Think Tank to review the current knowledge and recently proposed ideas about disease mechanisms and treatment of SARDS. These panel discussions resulted in recommendations for future research strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and potential therapy for this condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-331
Number of pages13
JournalVeterinary Ophthalmology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Retinal Degeneration
early diagnosis
Secondary Prevention
Early Diagnosis
pathogenesis
blindness
therapeutics
dogs
Blindness
research planning
electroretinography
hyperadrenocorticism
white light
Adrenocortical Hyperfunction
Dogs
blue light
Mydriatics
Polydipsia
photoreceptors
Light

Keywords

  • autoimmune retinopathy
  • blindness
  • canine
  • endocrinopathy
  • hyperadrenocorticism
  • sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) - a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy. / Komáromy, András M.; Abrams, Kenneth L.; Heckenlively, John R.; Lundy, Steven K.; Maggs, David J; Leeth, Caroline M.; MohanKumar, Puliyur S.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Serreze, David V.; van der Woerdt, Alexandra.

In: Veterinary Ophthalmology, Vol. 19, No. 4, 01.07.2016, p. 319-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Komáromy, AM, Abrams, KL, Heckenlively, JR, Lundy, SK, Maggs, DJ, Leeth, CM, MohanKumar, PS, Petersen-Jones, SM, Serreze, DV & van der Woerdt, A 2016, 'Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) - a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy', Veterinary Ophthalmology, vol. 19, no. 4, pp. 319-331. https://doi.org/10.1111/vop.12291
Komáromy, András M. ; Abrams, Kenneth L. ; Heckenlively, John R. ; Lundy, Steven K. ; Maggs, David J ; Leeth, Caroline M. ; MohanKumar, Puliyur S. ; Petersen-Jones, Simon M. ; Serreze, David V. ; van der Woerdt, Alexandra. / Sudden acquired retinal degeneration syndrome (SARDS) - a review and proposed strategies toward a better understanding of pathogenesis, early diagnosis, and therapy. In: Veterinary Ophthalmology. 2016 ; Vol. 19, No. 4. pp. 319-331.
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