Successful self-directed lifelong learning in medicine: A conceptual model derived from qualitative analysis of a national survey of pediatric residents

Su-Ting Terry Li, Debora A Paterniti, John Patrick T Co, Daniel C. West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Self-directed lifelong learning is integral to medical professionalism, yet how best to encourage its development during clinically intensive training is unknown. The authors develop a model for successful self-directed learning by analyzing qualitative data from a national survey of residents. Method: Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents at 46 training programs completed a Web-based survey in 2008-2009. Self-reported barriers to and strategies for achieving self-directed learning goals were systematically analyzed through inductive iterative review. Results: A total of 992 out of 1,739 (57%) residents responded. Barriers to achieving self-directed learning goals were categorized into difficulty with personal reflection, environmental strain, competing demands, difficulty with goal generation, and problems with plan development and implementation. Strategies for achieving learning goals included creating goals that were important (relevant to the learner and prioritized by the learner as important to achieve), specific (with broad goals broken down into incremental steps and a specific plan for each step), measurable, accountable (with reminder and tracking systems and building in internal and external accountability), realistic (achievable goals which utilize existing opportunities and constant self-adjustment), and included a timeline for completing the goal (and incorporating the goal into their daily routine). Conclusions: On the basis of the data, the authors propose a conceptual model for self-directed lifelong learning involving creation of learning goals and plan development based on individual reflection and self-assessment, and continual revision of goals and/or plans based on degree of goal attainment. This model could be broadly applicable throughout medical education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1229-1236
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume85
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

lifelong learning
Medicine
Learning
medicine
resident
Pediatrics
learning
goal attainment
self-assessment
training program
Surveys and Questionnaires
Reminder Systems
responsibility
Social Adjustment
Social Responsibility
Medical Education
education
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Education

Cite this

@article{6217ff496eac445ebde5f720d63d4730,
title = "Successful self-directed lifelong learning in medicine: A conceptual model derived from qualitative analysis of a national survey of pediatric residents",
abstract = "Purpose: Self-directed lifelong learning is integral to medical professionalism, yet how best to encourage its development during clinically intensive training is unknown. The authors develop a model for successful self-directed learning by analyzing qualitative data from a national survey of residents. Method: Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents at 46 training programs completed a Web-based survey in 2008-2009. Self-reported barriers to and strategies for achieving self-directed learning goals were systematically analyzed through inductive iterative review. Results: A total of 992 out of 1,739 (57{\%}) residents responded. Barriers to achieving self-directed learning goals were categorized into difficulty with personal reflection, environmental strain, competing demands, difficulty with goal generation, and problems with plan development and implementation. Strategies for achieving learning goals included creating goals that were important (relevant to the learner and prioritized by the learner as important to achieve), specific (with broad goals broken down into incremental steps and a specific plan for each step), measurable, accountable (with reminder and tracking systems and building in internal and external accountability), realistic (achievable goals which utilize existing opportunities and constant self-adjustment), and included a timeline for completing the goal (and incorporating the goal into their daily routine). Conclusions: On the basis of the data, the authors propose a conceptual model for self-directed lifelong learning involving creation of learning goals and plan development based on individual reflection and self-assessment, and continual revision of goals and/or plans based on degree of goal attainment. This model could be broadly applicable throughout medical education.",
author = "Li, {Su-Ting Terry} and Paterniti, {Debora A} and Co, {John Patrick T} and West, {Daniel C.}",
year = "2010",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181e1931c",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "85",
pages = "1229--1236",
journal = "Academic Medicine",
issn = "1040-2446",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Successful self-directed lifelong learning in medicine

T2 - A conceptual model derived from qualitative analysis of a national survey of pediatric residents

AU - Li, Su-Ting Terry

AU - Paterniti, Debora A

AU - Co, John Patrick T

AU - West, Daniel C.

PY - 2010/7

Y1 - 2010/7

N2 - Purpose: Self-directed lifelong learning is integral to medical professionalism, yet how best to encourage its development during clinically intensive training is unknown. The authors develop a model for successful self-directed learning by analyzing qualitative data from a national survey of residents. Method: Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents at 46 training programs completed a Web-based survey in 2008-2009. Self-reported barriers to and strategies for achieving self-directed learning goals were systematically analyzed through inductive iterative review. Results: A total of 992 out of 1,739 (57%) residents responded. Barriers to achieving self-directed learning goals were categorized into difficulty with personal reflection, environmental strain, competing demands, difficulty with goal generation, and problems with plan development and implementation. Strategies for achieving learning goals included creating goals that were important (relevant to the learner and prioritized by the learner as important to achieve), specific (with broad goals broken down into incremental steps and a specific plan for each step), measurable, accountable (with reminder and tracking systems and building in internal and external accountability), realistic (achievable goals which utilize existing opportunities and constant self-adjustment), and included a timeline for completing the goal (and incorporating the goal into their daily routine). Conclusions: On the basis of the data, the authors propose a conceptual model for self-directed lifelong learning involving creation of learning goals and plan development based on individual reflection and self-assessment, and continual revision of goals and/or plans based on degree of goal attainment. This model could be broadly applicable throughout medical education.

AB - Purpose: Self-directed lifelong learning is integral to medical professionalism, yet how best to encourage its development during clinically intensive training is unknown. The authors develop a model for successful self-directed learning by analyzing qualitative data from a national survey of residents. Method: Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents at 46 training programs completed a Web-based survey in 2008-2009. Self-reported barriers to and strategies for achieving self-directed learning goals were systematically analyzed through inductive iterative review. Results: A total of 992 out of 1,739 (57%) residents responded. Barriers to achieving self-directed learning goals were categorized into difficulty with personal reflection, environmental strain, competing demands, difficulty with goal generation, and problems with plan development and implementation. Strategies for achieving learning goals included creating goals that were important (relevant to the learner and prioritized by the learner as important to achieve), specific (with broad goals broken down into incremental steps and a specific plan for each step), measurable, accountable (with reminder and tracking systems and building in internal and external accountability), realistic (achievable goals which utilize existing opportunities and constant self-adjustment), and included a timeline for completing the goal (and incorporating the goal into their daily routine). Conclusions: On the basis of the data, the authors propose a conceptual model for self-directed lifelong learning involving creation of learning goals and plan development based on individual reflection and self-assessment, and continual revision of goals and/or plans based on degree of goal attainment. This model could be broadly applicable throughout medical education.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954897307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77954897307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181e1931c

DO - 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181e1931c

M3 - Article

C2 - 20592521

AN - SCOPUS:77954897307

VL - 85

SP - 1229

EP - 1236

JO - Academic Medicine

JF - Academic Medicine

SN - 1040-2446

IS - 7

ER -