Successes and Challenges of Interprofessional Physiologic Birth and Obstetric Emergency Simulations in a Nurse-Midwifery Education Program

Jennifer Shaw Battista, Cynthia Belew, Deborah Anderson, Sandrijn van Schaik

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article describes childbirth simulation design and implementation within the nurse-midwifery education program at the University of California, San Francisco. Nurse-midwife and obstetrician faculty coordinators were supported by faculty from multiple professions and specialties in curriculum review and simulation development and implementation. The primary goal of the resulting technology-enhanced simulations of normal physiologic birth and obstetric emergencies was to assist learners' development of interprofessional competencies related to communication, teamwork, and patient-centered care. Trainees included nurse-midwifery students; residents in obstetrics, pediatrics, and family medicine; medical students; and advanced practice nursing students in pediatrics. The diversity of participant types and learning levels provided benefits and presented challenges to effective scenario-based simulation design among numerous other theoretical and logistical considerations. This project revealed practical solutions informed by emerging health sciences and education research literature, faculty experience, and formal course evaluations by learners. Best practices in simulation development and implementation were incorporated, including curriculum revision grounded in needs assessment, case- and event-based clinical scenarios, optimization of fidelity, and ample time for participant debriefing. Adequate preparation and attention to detail increased the immersive experience and benefits of simulation. Suggestions for fidelity enhancement are provided with examples of simulation scenarios, a timeline for preparations, and discussion topics to facilitate meaningful learning by maternity and newborn care providers and trainees in clinical and academic settings. Pre- and postsimulation measurements of knowledge, skills, and attitudes are ongoing and not reported. This article is part of a special series of articles that address midwifery innovations in clinical practice, education, interprofessional collaboration, health policy, and global health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)735-743
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Midwifery and Women's Health
Volume60
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2015

Keywords

  • Childbirth simulation
  • Clinical simulation
  • Emergencies
  • Health personnel
  • Interdisciplinary communication
  • Interprofessional education
  • Interprofessional relations
  • Learning
  • Normal birth
  • Nurse-midwives
  • Obstetrics
  • Patient care team
  • Physiologic birth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Maternity and Midwifery

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