Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects

Christopher M. Revell, Kyriacos A. Athanasiou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalTissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Chondrocytes
Repair
Defects
Transplants
Tissue
Stress Fractures
Grafts
Regeneration
Transplantation
Tissue Donors
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Biomaterials
  • Bioengineering
  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects. / Revell, Christopher M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

In: Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.03.2009, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{84f1bb3df7a74d9db8a0018eb0c5fba8,
title = "Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects",
abstract = "This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.",
author = "Revell, {Christopher M.} and Athanasiou, {Kyriacos A.}",
year = "2009",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ten.teb.2008.0189",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews",
issn = "1937-3368",
publisher = "Mary Ann Liebert Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Success rates and immunologic responses of autogenic, allogenic, and xenogenic treatments to repair articular cartilage defects

AU - Revell, Christopher M.

AU - Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

PY - 2009/3/1

Y1 - 2009/3/1

N2 - This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.

AB - This review examines current approaches available for articular cartilage repair, not only in terms of their regeneration potential, but also as a function of immunologic response. Autogenic repair techniques, including osteochondral plug transplantation, chondrocyte implantation, and microfracture, are the most widely accepted clinical treatment options due to the lack of immunogenic reactions, but only moderate graft success rates have been reported. Although suspended allogenic chondrocytes are shown to evoke an immune response upon implantation, allogenic osteochondral plugs and tissue-engineered grafts using allogenic chondrocytes exhibit a tolerable immunogenic response. Additionally, these repair techniques produce neotissue with success rates approaching those of currently available autogenic repair techniques, while simultaneously obviating their major hindrance of donor tissue scarcity. To date, limited research has been performed with xenogenic tissue, although several studies demonstrate the potential for its long-term success. This article focuses on the various treatment options for cartilage repair and their associated success rates and immunologic responses.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=65549119655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=65549119655&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1089/ten.teb.2008.0189

DO - 10.1089/ten.teb.2008.0189

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews

JF - Tissue Engineering - Part B: Reviews

SN - 1937-3368

IS - 1

ER -