Submersion injury

J. A. Kram, Kenneth W Kizer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Submersion injuries are a relatively common problem for emergency physicians. The primary physiologic problem in these patients is hypoxemia, and virtually all complications are secondary to this. Resuscitation depends on reversing hypoxemia and acidosis, then correcting the associated medical problems. Aggressive measures should be taken for all such patients, even after prolonged submersion, especially in young victims or when the water temperature was less than 70° F. Despite prompt and vigorous resuscitation, though, residual neurologic deficits and deaths continue to occur after submersion injury. Clearly, prevention is the most important factor in reducing the morbidity and mortality from these injuries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)545-552
Number of pages8
JournalEmergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Volume2
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Immersion
Resuscitation
Wounds and Injuries
Neurologic Manifestations
Acidosis
Emergencies
Morbidity
Physicians
Temperature
Mortality
Water
Hypoxia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Submersion injury. / Kram, J. A.; Kizer, Kenneth W.

In: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1984, p. 545-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kram, JA & Kizer, KW 1984, 'Submersion injury', Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 545-552.
Kram, J. A. ; Kizer, Kenneth W. / Submersion injury. In: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America. 1984 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 545-552.
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