Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and hip fracture and bone mineral density in older adults: The cardiovascular health study

Margaret C. Garin, Alice M. Arnold, Jennifer S. Lee, John A Robbins, Anne R. Cappola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is common in the elderly, yet its relationship with hip fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) is unclear. Objective: We examined the association between endogenous subclinical hyper- and hypothyroidism and hip fracture and BMD in older adults. Methods: A total of 4936 US individuals 65 years old or older enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study and not taking thyroid preparations were included. Analyses of incident hip fracture were performed by thyroid status, over a median follow-up of 12 years. A cross-sectional analysis of thyroid status and BMD was performed in a subset of 1317 participants who had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. Models were adjusted for risk factors and stratified by sex. Results: No association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism and incident hip fracture compared with euthyroidism, when assessed at a single time point or persisting at two time points, in either women [hazard ratio (HR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.20 for a single and HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.52-1.21 for two time points] or men (HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.82-1.95 for a single and HR 1.09,95%CI 0.57-2.10 for two time points). Likewise, no association was found between subclinical hyperthyroidism and incident hip fracture in either sex (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.55-2.25 in women and HR 1.78, 95% CI 0.56-5.66 in men). No association was found between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck sites. Conclusions: Our data suggest no association between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidismandhip fracture risk orBMDin oldermenandwomen.Additional data areneeded to improve the precision of estimates for subclinical hyperthyroidism and in men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2657-2664
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume99
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Pelvic Bones
Hip Fractures
Bone Density
Minerals
Hazards
Thyroid Gland
Bone
Health
Confidence Intervals
Hyperthyroidism
Hypothyroidism
Femur Neck
Sex Ratio
Hip
Spine
Cross-Sectional Studies
X-Rays
X rays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and hip fracture and bone mineral density in older adults : The cardiovascular health study. / Garin, Margaret C.; Arnold, Alice M.; Lee, Jennifer S.; Robbins, John A; Cappola, Anne R.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 99, No. 8, 2014, p. 2657-2664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is common in the elderly, yet its relationship with hip fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) is unclear. Objective: We examined the association between endogenous subclinical hyper- and hypothyroidism and hip fracture and BMD in older adults. Methods: A total of 4936 US individuals 65 years old or older enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study and not taking thyroid preparations were included. Analyses of incident hip fracture were performed by thyroid status, over a median follow-up of 12 years. A cross-sectional analysis of thyroid status and BMD was performed in a subset of 1317 participants who had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. Models were adjusted for risk factors and stratified by sex. Results: No association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism and incident hip fracture compared with euthyroidism, when assessed at a single time point or persisting at two time points, in either women [hazard ratio (HR) 0.91, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.20 for a single and HR 0.79, 95{\%} CI 0.52-1.21 for two time points] or men (HR 1.27, 95{\%} CI 0.82-1.95 for a single and HR 1.09,95{\%}CI 0.57-2.10 for two time points). Likewise, no association was found between subclinical hyperthyroidism and incident hip fracture in either sex (HR 1.11, 95{\%} CI 0.55-2.25 in women and HR 1.78, 95{\%} CI 0.56-5.66 in men). No association was found between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck sites. Conclusions: Our data suggest no association between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidismandhip fracture risk orBMDin oldermenandwomen.Additional data areneeded to improve the precision of estimates for subclinical hyperthyroidism and in men.",
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T1 - Subclinical thyroid dysfunction and hip fracture and bone mineral density in older adults

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AU - Garin, Margaret C.

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AU - Cappola, Anne R.

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N2 - Background: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is common in the elderly, yet its relationship with hip fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) is unclear. Objective: We examined the association between endogenous subclinical hyper- and hypothyroidism and hip fracture and BMD in older adults. Methods: A total of 4936 US individuals 65 years old or older enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study and not taking thyroid preparations were included. Analyses of incident hip fracture were performed by thyroid status, over a median follow-up of 12 years. A cross-sectional analysis of thyroid status and BMD was performed in a subset of 1317 participants who had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. Models were adjusted for risk factors and stratified by sex. Results: No association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism and incident hip fracture compared with euthyroidism, when assessed at a single time point or persisting at two time points, in either women [hazard ratio (HR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.20 for a single and HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.52-1.21 for two time points] or men (HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.82-1.95 for a single and HR 1.09,95%CI 0.57-2.10 for two time points). Likewise, no association was found between subclinical hyperthyroidism and incident hip fracture in either sex (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.55-2.25 in women and HR 1.78, 95% CI 0.56-5.66 in men). No association was found between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck sites. Conclusions: Our data suggest no association between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidismandhip fracture risk orBMDin oldermenandwomen.Additional data areneeded to improve the precision of estimates for subclinical hyperthyroidism and in men.

AB - Background: Subclinical thyroid dysfunction is common in the elderly, yet its relationship with hip fracture and bone mineral density (BMD) is unclear. Objective: We examined the association between endogenous subclinical hyper- and hypothyroidism and hip fracture and BMD in older adults. Methods: A total of 4936 US individuals 65 years old or older enrolled in the Cardiovascular Health Study and not taking thyroid preparations were included. Analyses of incident hip fracture were performed by thyroid status, over a median follow-up of 12 years. A cross-sectional analysis of thyroid status and BMD was performed in a subset of 1317 participants who had dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. Models were adjusted for risk factors and stratified by sex. Results: No association was found between subclinical hypothyroidism and incident hip fracture compared with euthyroidism, when assessed at a single time point or persisting at two time points, in either women [hazard ratio (HR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.20 for a single and HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.52-1.21 for two time points] or men (HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.82-1.95 for a single and HR 1.09,95%CI 0.57-2.10 for two time points). Likewise, no association was found between subclinical hyperthyroidism and incident hip fracture in either sex (HR 1.11, 95% CI 0.55-2.25 in women and HR 1.78, 95% CI 0.56-5.66 in men). No association was found between subclinical thyroid dysfunction and BMD at the lumbar spine, total hip, or femoral neck sites. Conclusions: Our data suggest no association between subclinical hypothyroidism or subclinical hyperthyroidismandhip fracture risk orBMDin oldermenandwomen.Additional data areneeded to improve the precision of estimates for subclinical hyperthyroidism and in men.

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