Studies on autogeny in Culex tarsalis: 3. Life table attributes of autogenous and anautogenous strains under laboratory conditions.

William Reisen, M. M. Milby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The reproductive biology and life table attributes of autogenous and anautogenous strains of Cx. tarsalis which were selected from the same parent colony were compared under laboratory conditions. Autogenous mosquitoes required 1 day longer to complete immature development, but oviposited 1 to 2 days earlier than anautogenous mosquitoes. Autogenous females readily imbibed blood meals from restrained chickens if ovarian maturation had not progressed to Christophers' Stage III. Wing length and life expectancy were not significantly different between strains; however, autogenous females laid a significantly smaller number of eggs per raft during initial oviposition than anautogenous females. Egg raft size did not differ significantly between strains during subsequent ovipositions resulting in similar net reproductive rates (Ro). Earlier oviposition and a comparable Ro resulted in a greater intrinsic rate of increase (rm) and birth rate (b) for autogenous than anautogenous cohorts. Thus, highly autogenous populations would be able to exploit newly created surface water breeding sources more rapidly than highly anautogenous populations. However, highly autogenous populations probably would not be able to transmit a horizontally maintained arbovirus as efficiently as anautogenous populations, since autogenous females imbibe their initial blood meal later in life than anautogenous females.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)619-625
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume3
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1987
Externally publishedYes

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autogeny
Culex tarsalis
Culex
Life Tables
life table
life tables
Oviposition
oviposition
blood meal
Culicidae
mosquito
Population
Meals
blood
Arboviruses
arboviruses
birth rate
life expectancy
Birth Rate
egg size

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

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abstract = "The reproductive biology and life table attributes of autogenous and anautogenous strains of Cx. tarsalis which were selected from the same parent colony were compared under laboratory conditions. Autogenous mosquitoes required 1 day longer to complete immature development, but oviposited 1 to 2 days earlier than anautogenous mosquitoes. Autogenous females readily imbibed blood meals from restrained chickens if ovarian maturation had not progressed to Christophers' Stage III. Wing length and life expectancy were not significantly different between strains; however, autogenous females laid a significantly smaller number of eggs per raft during initial oviposition than anautogenous females. Egg raft size did not differ significantly between strains during subsequent ovipositions resulting in similar net reproductive rates (Ro). Earlier oviposition and a comparable Ro resulted in a greater intrinsic rate of increase (rm) and birth rate (b) for autogenous than anautogenous cohorts. Thus, highly autogenous populations would be able to exploit newly created surface water breeding sources more rapidly than highly anautogenous populations. However, highly autogenous populations probably would not be able to transmit a horizontally maintained arbovirus as efficiently as anautogenous populations, since autogenous females imbibe their initial blood meal later in life than anautogenous females.",
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