Studies of congenitally immunologically mutant New Zealand mice. VII. The ontogeny of thymic abnormalities and reconstitution of nude NZB/W mice

M. Eric Gershwin, J. J. Castles, W. Saito, A. Ahmed

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Abstract

The thymus of New Zealand (NZ) mice undergoes premature degeneration both in vitro and in vivo. This involution has often been correlated with the age-dependent loss of NZ mice T helper function. To further define the ontogeny of these events the growth of NZ fetal and neonatal thymus and thymic epithelial cells were studied and compared with BALB/c controls using the techniques of anterior corneal chamber transplantation, organ culture, and tissue culture. NZB fetal thymus, including functional studies of thymic epithelial cells, was similar to BALB/c fetal thymus. In contrast, tissue culture of neonatal NZB, but no BALB/c, thymic epithelium underwent premature degeneration and failed to demonstrate functional activity. The relationships between age-dependent T cell deficiencies were further studied by attempting to reconstitute 4-wk-old NZB/W congenitally athymic (nude) mice using spleen cells from serially aged NZB/W nu/+ controls. Fourweek-old, but not 8-mo-old, NZB/W nu/+ spleen cells reconstituted the response of NZB/W nude mice to SRBC and increased the frequency of spleen cells with T cell markers. However, when adherent cells were depleted from 8-mo-old NZB/W spleen cells, reconstitution of NZB/W nude recipients was again noted. The adherent suppressor cell population of older NZB/W nu/+ mice was also observed in older NZB/W nude mice. Finally, spleen cells, including enriched splenic T and B cells, from autoantibody-producing NZB/W nu/+ animals were unable to transfer sustained production of antibodies to dsDNA when injected into NZB/W nude recepients. The acquired T helper cell deficiency to older NZB/W mice appears secondary to the presence of splenic macrophage suppressor cells and is unrelated to the premature degeneration or involution of thymus or thymic epithelial elements. Finally, NZB/W nude mice are not susceptible to tranfer of autoimmune disease by 'educated' T cells, and the survival of T cell reconstituted NZB/W nude mice is similar to nonreconstituted controls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2150-2155
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume129
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1982

Fingerprint

Inbred NZB Mouse
New Zealand
Nude Mice
Thymus Gland
Spleen
T-Lymphocytes
Epithelial Cells
Corneal Transplantation
Organ Culture Techniques
Anterior Chamber
Helper-Inducer T-Lymphocytes
Autoantibodies
Autoimmune Diseases
Antibody Formation
Cell Survival
B-Lymphocytes
Epithelium
Macrophages

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Studies of congenitally immunologically mutant New Zealand mice. VII. The ontogeny of thymic abnormalities and reconstitution of nude NZB/W mice. / Gershwin, M. Eric; Castles, J. J.; Saito, W.; Ahmed, A.

In: Journal of Immunology, Vol. 129, No. 5, 1982, p. 2150-2155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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